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Tag: Open Source (Page 2 of 9)

Nuxeo Releases New Version of Open Source Document Management Software

Nuxeo, the Open Source Enterprise Content Management (ECM) platform company, released a new version of Nuxeo Document Management and Nuxeo Enterprise Platform today. Nuxeo DM 5.4.2 offers a host of usability and social features to make the user experience even smoother and more streamlined. Key contributions highlight the value of community involvement in the strategy of continuous innovation for the Nuxeo platform. The release of Nuxeo DM 5.4.2 and its underlying platform, Nuxeo EP, demonstrates execution on a vision of ongoing innovation, community engagement, and open standards support, delivered to content management application architects and developers. Driven by community feedback, many of the new features and enhancements improve usability of the application, using state-of-the-art technologies and standards, such as OpenSocial, OAuth, HTML5, WebDAV, and CMIS. The new WSS connector was contributed by Nuxeo partner Gagnavarslan, an ECM solution provider in Iceland. The Nuxeo and Gagnavarslan teams collaborated to integrate this new component after passing the Nuxeo QA process. With this connector, the Nuxeo repository can be mapped as a drive under MS Windows or Mac OS X. Other contributions include ongoing enhancements for the OpenSocial integration from customer Leroy Merlin. It now supports the GWT OpenSocial container, making the dashboard faster, and providing more gadgets and layout options. In addition, the Nuxeo platform is now completely integrated with OpenSocial and fully supports OAuth, allowing for external gadget integration in Nuxeo DM, and the use of Nuxeo DM gadgets in external containers, such as iGoogle. OAuth support ensures control of which services are used and the scope of data shared between applications. While the GWT container is well equipped to manage dashboards, a new light OpenSocial JavaScript Gadget container offers a quick and easy way to add an OpenSocial gadget to a content template in Nuxeo DM. Other highlights of Nuxeo EP and DM 5.4.2 include: HTML 5 Drag’n’Drop; New system properties for the CMIS interface; Improved User Interface layout; Content Views; and Facets. Nuxeo DM 5.4.2 is available with no license charge, download options include an installable application for Windows, Linux or Mac environments, as well as a pre-configured virtual appliance for VMWare or VirtualBox-compatible environments. Nuxeo DM can also be previewed instantly with an online trial version. http://www.nuxeo.com

Nuxeo Releases BIRT Integration Package for Nuxeo ECM Applications

Nuxeo, the Open Source Enterprise Content Management (ECM) platform company, announced the availability of a new package in the Nuxeo Marketplace that connects Nuxeo Enterprise Platform (EP)-based applications and the open source Business Intelligence tool, Eclipse BIRT. The Nuxeo – BIRT Integration offers report design and access from within a Nuxeo ECM application. The Nuxeo – BIRT Integration offers integrated reporting capabilities on top of Nuxeo EP-based applications, enabling the design, rendering, and access of reports and analytics. The BIRT Engine has been integrated in Nuxeo EP, so that reporting capabilities are available without leaving the Nuxeo application, and security controls can be managed in one place. The Nuxeo – BIRT Integration package is available on the Nuxeo Marketplace. http://www.nuxeo.com/ http://www.eclipse.org/birt/phoenix/

Acquia Launches Drupal Gardens 1.0

Acquia announced the general availability release of Drupal Gardens 1.0 with new capabilities and pricing plans. Drupal Gardens is a way to build content-rich dynamic sites. Views provides Drupal Gardens with a collection of tools for site builders with the simplicity of software-as-a-service (SaaS) delivery. Without writing any code, Views allows creation of custom mashups or combinations of content, media, user profiles, and more. Site builders can point and click to pull together any information on their site and craft lists, grids, tables, reports, RSS feeds, and navigation. Views can also be configured to display different results based on visitor interactions, such as displaying posts submitted over the past month versus the most popular. With Views, Drupal Gardens sites can be assembled and deployed with dynamic content. Importantly, there is no lock-in for site builders and owners with Drupal Gardens’ OpenSaaS approach. If there is a need to add custom modules, simply export the complete site to Acquia Dev Cloud or your own hosting environment. Drupal Gardens is offering a tiered pricing structure ranging from individuals to large enterprises. drupalgardens.com

Lucene Open Source Community Commits to a Future in Search

It has been nearly two years since I commented on an article in Information Week, Open Source, Its Time has Come, Nov. 2008. My main point was the need for deep expertise to execute enterprise search really well. I predicted the growth of service companies with that expertise, particularly for open source search. Not long after I announced that, Lucid Imagination was launched, with its focus on building and supporting solutions based on Lucene and, its more turnkey version, Solr.

It has not taken long for Lucid Imagination (LI) to take charge of the Lucene/Solr community of practice (CoP), and to launch its own platform built on Solr, Lucidworks Enterprise. Open source depends on deep and sustained collaboration; LI stepped into the breach to ensure that the hundreds of contributors, users and committers have a forum. I am pretty committed to CoPs myself and know that nurturing a community for the long haul takes dedicated leadership. In this case it is undoubtedly enlightened self-interest that is driving LI. They are poised to become the strongest presence for driving continuous improvements to open source search, with Apache Lucene as the foundation.

Two weeks ago LI hosted Lucene Revolution, the first such conference in the US. It was attended by over 300 in Boston, October 7-8 and I can report that this CoP is vibrant, enthusiastic. Moderated by Steve Arnold, the program ran smoothly and with excellent sessions. Those I attended reflected a respectful exchange of opinions and ideas about tools, methods, practices and priorities. While there were allusions to vigorous debate among committers about priorities for code changes and upgrades, the mood was collaborative in spirit and tinged with humor, always a good way to operate when emotions and convictions are on stage.

From my 12 pages of notes come observations about the three principal categories of sessions:

  1. Discussions, debates and show-cases for significant changes or calls for changes to the code
  2. Case studies based on enterprise search applications and experiences
  3. Case studies based on the use of Lucene and Solr embedded in commercial applications

Since the first category was more technical in nature, I leave the reader with my simplistic conclusions: core Apache Lucene and Solr will continue to evolve in a robust and aggressive progression. There are sufficient committers to make a serious contribution. Many who have decades of search experience are driving the charge and they have cut their teeth on the more difficult problems of implementing enterprise solutions. In announcing Lucidworks Enterprise, LI is clearly bidding to become a new force in the enterprise search market.

New and sustained build-outs of Lucene/Solr will be challenged by developers with ideas for diverging architectures, or “forking” code, on which Eric Gries, LI CEO, commented in the final panel. He predicted that forking will probably be driven by the need to solve specific search problems that current code does not accommodate. This will probably be more of a challenge for the spinoffs than the core Lucene developers, and the difficulty of sustaining separate versions will ultimately fail.

Enterprise search cases reflected those for whom commercial turnkey applications will not or cannot easily be selected; for them open source will make sense. Coming from LI’s counterpart in the Linux world, Red Hat, are these earlier observations about why enterprises should seek to embrace open source solutions, in short the sorry state of quality assurance and code control in commercial products. Add to that the cost of services to install, implement and customize commercial search products. The argument would be to go with open source for many institutions when there is an imperative or call for major customization.

This appears to be the case for two types of enterprises that were featured on the program: educational institutions and government agencies. Both have procurement issues when it comes to making large capital expenditures. For them it is easier to begin with something free, like open source software, then make incremental improvements and customize over time. Labor and services are cost variables that can be distributed more creatively using multiple funding options. Featured on the program were the Smithsonian, Adhere Solutions doing systems integration work for a number of government agencies, MITRE (a federally funded research laboratory), U. of Michigan, and Yale. CISCO also presented, a noteworthy commercial enterprise putting Lucene/Solr to work.

The third category of presenters was, by far, the largest contingent of open source search adopters, producers of applications that leverage Lucene and Solr (and other open source software) into their offerings. They are solidly entrenched because they are diligent committers, and share in this community of like-minded practitioners who serve as an extended enterprise of technical resources that keeps their overhead low. I can imagine the attractiveness of a lean business that can run with an open source foundation, and operates in a highly agile mode. This must be enticing and exciting for developers who wilt at the idea of working in a constrained environment with layers of management and political maneuvering.

Among the companies building applications on Lucene that presented were: Access Innovations, Twitter, LinkedIn, Acquia, RivetLogic and Salesforce.com. These stand out as relatively mature adopters with traction in the marketplace. There were also companies present that contribute their value through Lucene/Solr partnerships in which their products or tools are complementary including: Basis Technology, Documill, and Loggly.

Links to presentations by organizations mentioned above will take you to conference highlights. Some will appeal to the technical reader for there was a lot of code sharing and technical tips in the slides. The diversity and scale of applications that are being supported by Lucene and Solr was impressive. Lucid Imagination and the speakers did a great job of illustrating why and how open source has a serious future in enterprise search. This was a confidence building exercise for the community.

Two sentiments at the end summed it up for me. On the technical front Eric Gries observed that it is usually clear what needs to be core (to the code) and what does not belong. Then there is a lot of gray area, and that will contribute to constant debate in the community. For the user community, Charlie Hull, of flax opined that customers don’t care whether (the code) is in the open source core or in the special “secret sauce” application, as long as the product does what they want.

DotNetNuke Introduces Enterprise Edition

DotNetNuke Corp.,the Web Content Management Platform company, announced the release of the DotNetNuke Enterprise Edition. The Enterprise Edition includes the new DotNetNuke Content Staging feature that allows users to edit and approve content on a staging server prior to pushing the site to production. In addition, the DotNetNuke Web CMS includes a Content Localization feature that enables management of multi-language web sites. The Content Localization feature is included in all Editions of the platform including the Enterprise, Professional and Community Editions. Exclusive to the Enterprise Edition, Content Staging allows users to create a separate staging server where all intended production web site changes can be implemented and tested before being published publicly. It has features for organizations with many content contributors and tight restrictions on web site content publishing and review. The system will compare the staging server configuration to the production server and identify missing components and provides a detailed view of all planned changes. Other features include: An audit tool that creates a record of all publishing events; A “white list” in which users can define which modules should push both their settings and content during publishing and which should push only the module settings; A secure publishing function which allows users to easily push their site from staging to production. All Editions of DotNetNuke including the Enterprise, Professional and Community Editions, now feature a new Content Localization capability that helps users manage translated versions of their web pages. This feature includes management and configuration-mapping tools to keep translated pages synchronized across a web site. With the introduction of the Enterprise Edition, DotNetNuke will no longer offer the Elite Edition, which will now comprise the Professional Edition plus Elite Support. The new Elite Support option – available for the Professional and Enterprise Editions – features extended support hours, faster guaranteed support, priority management of support tickets, installation upgrade assistance, and source code access to the proprietary Professional or Enterprise Edition modules. http://www.dotnetnuke.com

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