Modern Design Tools: Adaptive Layouts

I’m sure there are exceptions, but design has almost always followed function in software development. That was never a great situation, but today’s reality of the constant additions of new form factors forces us to figure out how build function and design in a more parallel and earlier iterative environment.

Responsive design is an important approach to dress up the past and get started with workable multichannel publishing, but its scale is limited.

See Josh Puckett’s discussion in Modern Design Tools: Adaptive Layouts for some great ideas and links to other discussions.

Since our tools shape our thinking, it’s critical that we have design tools that allow us to go beyond the static thinking that has encumbered us for so long. While it’s technically possible to design and optimize for various layouts and orientations today, it’s tedious and difficult, which means that we often don’t do it.

Design tools should have the same properties as the medium for which we are designing… Let’s take a look at how a modern design tool might work for designing an iPhone app. Read more

Google deep linking progress

In How Google is Taking Search Outside the Box Steven Levy comments on this year’s I/O event. He does a nice job of explaining deep linking / app indexing, and the much mentioned Google Now on Tap in the context of Google’s mobile and search challenges.

Google now says that it has expanded its app indexing program to Apple’s iOS platform. “App indexing” is the practice of Hoovering up the data that lives inside apps, the first step to making that information available by Google searching — it’s analogous to crawling the web. Google has been doing this since 2013 for Android apps, essentially creating an index that lives on a simulation of a giant Android phone. And I do mean giant: there are 50 billion deep links indexed so far. (Deep links are those which take you directly to relevant information inside an app, as opposed to leading you to the front door.)

I found the 50 billion indexed deep links surprising, especially since they are almost all from Android apps, and from only a little more than half of the developers asked to participate. There is a decent developer value proposition, but it will be interesting to see what Apple decides to do to keep control of its ecosystem. And then there are Facebook, Twitter, and others. Google would most likely be the biggest beneficiary of a deep linking standard if there ever is one. Read more

Gilbane Advisor 6.3.15 – The future is mobile and apps, except that it isn’t

The future is mobile and apps, except that it isn’t

You may have read other articles making similar arguments but this post by Ben Evans is certainly one of the best.

There are two charts that capture a lot of the way we think about mobile today. In the first, we see that mobile devices are approaching a majority of traffic, and in the second, that a large proportion of all web traffic (a majority in the USA in this instance) and the vast majority of mobile traffic is coming from apps rather than the web. … However, if you’re not careful you can get quite the wrong impression from these. Read more

And if you’re a marketer how do you think about the tradeoffs?…

Apps versus the web

There’s an involved, technical and (for people like me) fascinating conversation in tech about smartphone apps and the web – what can each do, how discovery works, how they interplay, what Google plans with Chrome, how watches affect things, whether the web will take over as the dominant form and so on. … But for an actual brand, developer or publisher wondering if they should do an app or a website, I generally answer that the calculation is much simpler and less technical: Do people want to put your icon on their home screen? Read more

Ad blocking software has figured out native content

This is going to get messy. Just one of the problems…

… ad blockers have grown exponentially in every market, and are now threatening the whole ecosystem.Their reach now extends to native advertising—which was, until now, relatively spared because native ads can be managed by the publisher’s Content Management System instead of an ad-server. But ABP’s engineers found a way to spot and remove any phrase like “sponsored content” or “sponsored by.” This creates pernicious side-effects, as the user won’t be able to distinguish between commercial and legitimate editorial content on websites. Read more

A Murky Road Ahead for Android, Despite Market Dominance

Farhad Manjoo provides a well done summary of Google’s challenges with Android. Read more

Speaking of mobile challenges…

Mozilla, mobile, and the web

Mozilla has a mobile problem. It also wants to keep the web healthy and provide an alternative to mobile walled gardens. Its mobile operating system, Firefox OS, is a worthy attempt to address both these issues. But this is a huge challenge. Read more

Influence People by Leveraging the Brain’s Laziness

For designers and marketers to consider…

… there is still an assumption that the environment is treated as a reflection of information that should drive preferences. For instance, it’s assumed that people tend to stick with the default option because they do not know enough to change it. … This view of decision-making assumes that information is always at the core of the cognitive economy. But in fact, energy is the key currency that the cognitive system seeks to preserve. … people are not treating the environment around them as information in most deliberative processes. Instead, they are performing the easiest actions with as little thought as possible. So if we want to influence other people’s behavior, we must make desirable behaviors easy and undesirable behaviors hard. Read more

Speaking of lazy brains…

Beware Spurious Correlations

A quick look at a graph can be a dangerous thing.

We all know the truism “Correlation doesn’t imply causation,” but when we see lines sloping together, bars rising together, or points on a scatterplot clustering, the data practically begs us to assign a reason. We want to believe one exists. … Statistically we can’t make that leap, however. Charts that show a close correlation are often relying on a visual parlor trick to imply a relationship. Read more

UX is UI

A little long but food for thought for product managers, UX/UI designers, and their execs.

… Product Managers: You might think you have all the answers with a combination of Google Analytics and your own hubris, and that’s fine if you can afford to be wrong. But please, stop hiring UX Designers to just implement what you’ve already decided. … UX Designers: If you want to make the world a better place, you have to take a strategic hand in defining what gets put into the world, not just how that thing works.  Read more

4 topologies of integrated marketing technology stacks

Will there ever be a dominant marketing technology platform / ecosystem? Will there be n overlapping platforms with competing components and centers of gravity? Where will there be stronger links? weaker links? Scott Brinker frames up the situation… Read more

And now for a look at another kind of ecosystem…

Apple Watch and Continuous Computing

Ben Thompson’s non-review review and analysis of the watch and its place in the computing ecosystem is excellent. Read more

Short takes

What do service providers really care about? Less lipstick on the As-a-Service pig please… via horsesforsources.com

A techie experiment with cross-posting on Mediumvia Medium

Inside Quartz’s thinking and a little bit of what’s coming… Quartz is an API via NiemanLab

A reminder that your Instagram photos aren’t really yours: Someone else can sell them for $90,000 … Well, not exactly, but still an interesting storyvia the Washington Post

Some good points on the supposed Power of the Screenshot via Medium

Mary Meeker’s 2015 Internet Trends report may not be, or have much news, but has lots of stats. via Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers

Tim’s Web Decay Graph is a bit depressing, as are the broken links on my 19 year old site even after multiple link updating efforts. via tbray.org

Lenovo’s smartphone that can project apps right in front of you is interesting but what we need is a configurable movable holographic display. via Business Insider

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year.

Gilbane Advisor 5.12.15 – The Omni Channel Paradox

The Omni Channel Paradox

We all say it in slightly different ways: A superior customer experience requires consistent, seamless, experience across all channels. Depending on our job, we tend to focus on different integration challenges. Easy to say, but Mayur Gupta points out just how multi-faceted and formidable this fragmentation is.

Brands have as much of a chance of driving frictionless omnichannel consumer experiences as a Formula One race car driver trying to win a race on flat tires. Impossible!!!

The very model and capabilities used to make the experience omnichannel and seamless is its biggest roadblock. We are trying to create connected experiences using a massively fragmented ecosystem spanning data and technology, agencies and media management, and organizational and operating models. With all the disruption within the digital landscape putting the consumer at the center and in full control, the consumer has effortlessly become omnichannel while brands still struggle with being multichannel, at best.

What is preventing this from happening? Fragmentation. It exists in these core areas: … Read more

Speaking of challenging fragments…

5 Drivers that will shape the future of your MarTech strategy

As Scott Brinker and others have shown, the marketing technology landscape is nightmarishly large and complex. And of course marketing needs vary widely by organization. Gerry Murry has a framework to help marketing execs get started organizing and building their strategy.

To optimize their digital marketing activities, marketers will have to focus on their particular business models, audiences, and overall objectives in order to make the best choices. Strategic frameworks for investment based on key business drivers are needed to govern the process of consolidating current systems and guiding future purchases. Read more

Did Video Kill Text Content Marketing?

No, and it won’t.

Reading articles and watching videos also require two different brain processes. When we read, the process requires us to be actively involved. The brain gets a much better workout when reading vs. watching, and the process requires a longer attention span and deeper cognitive efforts.

Visitors have their own preferences, many will always click on the video option because it is the easiest and therefore the most natural choice. But many others will choose to read text by default because they want to control their experience, dig into details, and organize thoughts in different orders. Text provides more reader control. It is also usually faster and more  efficient.

As a marketer you need to consider different visitor preferences, but you also need to match the form to the job. If you want to attract a browser’s attention a video is usually a better way to go – it provides less of an effort-barrier. But if you want a visitor to engage in the extra work to learn about product features, options, and pricing so they can make a decision to buy, text is likely to be the least frustrating and most effective way to get the job done.

Liraz Margalit has much more to say about the research behind this.  Read more

Some are more careful about video use than others…

Time to kill the 800-word article

Quartz is doing a great job pushing towards a modern social, mobile, web news format. Video use, even by respected media channels, is often still largely off-putting, so it is worth keeping an eye on QZs video experiments.

“We’re not going to run pre-roll on videos. We’re pushing the video team to figure out what the future of online news video is. Our conviction is liberating them from traffic requirements, from pre-roll inventory requirements, is the best way to experiment with formats and the social distribution of video and see what works.” Read more

The bot bubble

How Click Farms Have Inflated Social Media Currency

We all know there are lots of bogus social network accounts and that they are bought by many businesses and individuals. This is a fascinating exposé of a “not illegal in the Philippines” business supplying fake accounts for click farms. Want to know what shocking percentage of fake profiles could be included in your advertising campaigns? …  Read more

What does Google need on mobile?

Short answer is reach and data, but…

The interesting part, though, is that there are now lots of different kinds of reach.

First, as everyone has talked about for years, the way that mobile moves us away from the plain old web as the dominant interaction model of the internet challenges Google’s central ability to understand the structure of online information and to link to it (and sell links to it). Apps cut off Google’s reach, both to get data into its systems, since apps are opaque, and to surface data out to internet users, since any search in Yelp’s specialist app is a search that wasn’t on Google, and such apps are stronger on mobile than on the desktop. Apps reduce Google’s reach in both senses. This of course is why (like Facebook) it has been pursuing deep links… Read more

The Watch

or not. Horace Dediu weighs in on the point of the Apple watch, that is, is it a watch or something else. I have always thought of it as a computer, though one currently limited. I bought one because it is a computer, and wouldn’t have bought it and won’t be wearing it as a watch. I also like John Gruber’s characterization it as a “gadget-y computer”:

Loosely, the path of all consumer electronic categories is to evolve as ever more computer-y gadgets, until a tipping point occurs and they turn into ever more gadget-y genuine computers. … Apple seemingly tries to enter markets at, or just after, that tipping point … to produce a gadget-y computer that the computer-y gadgets from the established market leaders cannot compete with… That was the iPhone.

Dediu’s nuanced view…

Before its launch, I said that the Apple Watch would be as much a watch as the iPhone is a phone.

I had the chance to use the Watch for a few days and can say that timekeeping is probably as insignificant to its essence as it’s possible to be. It feels like a watch in the physical sense, looking good in the process (as the iPhone physically felt like a phone, also without being hard on the eyes)

However it does not feel like a watch conceptually. I find myself drawn into a conversation by its vocabulary of vibrations. I find myself talking to it. I find myself listening to it. I find myself glancing at information about faraway places. I find myself paying for things with it. I find myself checking into flights with it. I order transportation, listen to news, check live data streams and get myself nagged to exercise. It tells me where I am. It tells me where to go. It tells me when to leave.

Nothing ever worn on a wrist, or anywhere else for that matter, has done any of these things before. Not only are these things mesmerizing but they are done in a productive way on a wristwatch. In other words they are done in a mindful way. Read more

Remember the Filter Bubble?

Lot’s of commentary on the Facebook research published in Science last week. The first Read more link goes to the reaction of Eli Pariser the author of the book, The Filter Bubble: What the Internet is Hiding From You, but I’ve added a few others that are meaty. Read more here, and here, and here.

 

Short takes

Compare your mobile traffic before and after the April 21st Mobile update and dig deeper into your search data with the new More precise data in the new Search Analytics report. Also see FAQs about the April 21st mobile-friendly update via Google

Seems like a promising idea. Imagining it feels natural… MIT develops wireless trackpad for your thumbnail via itworld.com

Will REST convince skeptics that WordPress is a real CMS? This look at the future of WordPress is also a useful resource non-developers on REST – a little techy but not written by a developer. via wpmudev.org

Translation is not about words, it’s about meaning, but you need to write for machines… Google Translate is only as dumb as you allow it via Content Strategy Forum

Latest on trends in the State of the News Media 2015 via Pew Research Center

Nice follow-up on some content marketing advice by applying it to a questioner’s company as an example… Applying Evergreen Content Formulas to Close.io … and of course great content marketing for the author! via inbound.org

Uh Oh, … The Age of the Full-Stack Marketer via Gartner

Wonder how the Apple watch will effect your email campaigns?… 6 predictions as to how the Apple Watch will impact email marketers via Campaign Monitor

Links are broken. These three alternatives have improved our readers’ reading experience. Well, the experience is broken, via Medium

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year.

Gilbane Advisor 4.16.15 – The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers deadline is May 1
Learn more

The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être

John Kirk is mostly right, but there is more to say. Though it’s fun to speculate on Apple’s initial intent, it is more useful to consider how the Apple watch actually fits into the the evolution of computing, and what it suggests about what comes next.

The effective purpose of the watch is not just to make computing more socially acceptable, or even more convenient, but to do so because computing is becoming part of the fabric of daily modern life and computing devices are inexorably shrinking. This is true across the spectrum from general purpose computers to single-purpose sensors.

The most important general purpose computer now is the smartphone. But smartphones got so small they had to get bigger because computing power is well ahead of the sophistication of our technology for communicating with them. The size of smartphones, and watches, limits their range of interactions, but is necessary for their individual utility, a prerequisite for convenience.

Convenience is a matter of degree, and no other computing devices had much of it to start and are still largely lacking. But the dramatic ramp-up in reach already happening with smartphones, and coming quickly with more ubiquitous computing clearly demands more convenience be designed in to the entire experience. This is Apple’s wheelhouse.

still think that “Smartwatches are the most likely next-in-line competition to smartphones, certainly more so than tablets or glasses, before we enter the world of implants, stick-ons, or other fashion accessory choices.”, and I agree with Kirk’s bullishness about the Apple watch. Read more

Has Visual Design Fallen Flat?

… a lot of today’s visual language is about clean simplicity, executed well. There are a few fashion trends in there, sure, but in general this is a list of objectively desirable qualities. It reflects a maturity to the aesthetics of digital design that has been developing for decades,

When you squint your eyes and tilt your head, don’t a lot of these products look awfully, well, similar? Don’t they look pretty but, at times, a little dull?

When it becomes necessary for virtually every business to signal they value design by adopting an up-to-date style, it becomes a commodity, a box to be ticked. That fresh look quickly becomes a cliché. This descent towards aesthetic monoculture was helped… Read more

What the New York Times CIO is doing to make the newspaper a mobile-first company

CIO Marc Frons’ description of what they are doing is a good example of the kind of thinking other executives should be involved in. Read more

The promise of the web

Short (2 min read), sweet, and true…

if the web didn’t exist, it would be necessary to invent itRead more

Proprietary services vs open protocols

If you only have 1 minute…

1/ the history of the internet is a series of battles between proprietary services and open protocols… Read more

A longer, related read…

Will Deep Links Ever Truly Be Deep?

This is a more in-depth post with some historical context exploring the importance of links and what much of the debate over mobile apps and deep linking misses or glosses over. Read more

Never trust a corporation to do a library’s job

For years, Google’s mission included the preservation of the past… Two months ago, Larry Page said the company’s outgrown its 14-year-old mission statement. Its ambitions have grown, and its priorities have shifted… Google in 2015 is focused on the present and future. Its social and mobile efforts, experiments with robotics and artificial intelligence, self-driving vehicles and fiberoptics.

Ok. But fortunately…

The Internet Archive is mostly known for archiving the web, a task the San Francisco-based nonprofit has tirelessly done since 1996, two years before Google was founded. The Wayback Machine now indexes over 435 billion webpages going back nearly 20 years, the largest archive of the web. For most people, it ends there. But that’s barely scratching the surface. Read more

The data science ecosystem

If marketing technologists aren’t scared by scads of software tools, data scientists shouldn’t be either. Here is a knowledgable start at a landscape.

Because data science is growing so rapidly, we now have a massive ecosystem of useful tools… Since data science is so inherently cross-functional, many of these companies and tools are hard to categorize. But at the very highest level, they break down into the three main parts of a data scientist’s work flow. Namely: getting data, wrangling data and analyzing data. I’ll be covering them in that real-world order, starting first with getting data, or data sources. Read more

Links

Developers already know this, but business managers should also understand the process… Apple’s App Store review process is hurting users, but we’re not allowed to talk about it via Medium

I know, this may not sound serious at first, but it is worth a read… How The Screenshort Could Save Us From Horrible Headlines via BuzzFeed

Need to get processable data out of reports in PDF? If you’re a little technical here is some help… Purifying the Sea of PDF Data, Automatically via NYT Open

Less than half of the enterprise collaboration tools installed have many employees using them regularly… Why No One Uses the Corporate Social Network via hbr.org

Gilbane Conference call for papers deadline is May 1

The Gilbane Conference on Content, Technology and Customer Experience takes place at the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston, December 1 – 3, 2015.

The Gilbane Conference helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders.

A modern customer experience must be holistic and seamless. Holistic in that customer communications be consistent within the company and across all touch points and channels, and seamless so that transitions between customer interactions are smooth and frictionless. This is a continuous process that requires an unprecedented amount of collaboration and integration between internal and external facing organizations and systems.

This year we focus on how to integrate content, data, and software to support a superior multichannel digital customer experience. Whether you are just getting started with managing multichannel content, need to improve the consistency of the web and mobile discovery experience, or are ready to integrate with an ecommerce, content marketing, business intelligence or other marketing or data management platform, join us to learn what your peers are doing and what experts are recommending.

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year.

Gilbane Advisor 3.31.15 – Is a Mobile Deep Linking Standard Necessary?

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers

Share and network with your peers as a speaker at our next conference. Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston. December 1-3.  Learn more

How to Launch Your Digital Platform

…I draw from this research to offer a framework to help aspiring entrepreneurs make the right strategic decisions as they build their own platforms…

This is also for intrapreneurs. Read more

A Few Questions for Publishers Contemplating Facebook as a Platform

John Battelle…

Well, it’s happening. According to no less authoritative source than The New York TimesThe New York Times is preparing to plant a taproot right inside the highly walled garden that is Facebook. … But as testing beings, here are a few questions any publisher should ask before dipping a taproot into Facebook’s carefully cultivated soils… Read more

Does it matter?…

Facebook hosting doesn’t change things, the world already changed

A bit of a contrary view. Long but lots to chew on.

All this sound and fury, signifying nothing. … Let’s just list all the conditions that exist and won’t change one bit whether or not you let Facebook host your content… Read more

The Facebook Reckoning

And then there’s Ben Thompson’s analysis on why at least some publishers may not have a choice.

The problem is that online ads are inherently deflationary: just as content has zero marginal cost, so does ad inventory, which means it’s trivial to make more. A limited amount of total advertising dollars spread over more inventory, though, means any individual ad is worth less and less.

This resulted in a bit of a prisoner’s dilemma: the optimal action for any individual publication, particularly in the absence of differentiated ad placements or targeting capability, is to maximize ad placement opportunity (more content) and page views (more eyeballs), even though this action taken collectively only hastens the decline in the value of those ads. Perversely, the resultant cheaper ads only intensify the push to create more content and capture more eyeballs; quality is very quickly a casualty.

What is interesting is the particular impact that mobile has had on this dynamic… Read more

But who actually trusts Facebook, or any single walled garden for all their news? Many of course, but they are not necessarily the demographic you want. And then there’s the fact that…

Many Facebook users still don’t know that their news feeds are filtered by an algorithm

In the extreme case, it may be that whenever a software developer in Menlo Park adjusts a parameter, someone somewhere wrongly starts to believe themselves to be unloved

Accidental or intentional. This could be you, or it could be the New York Times. Read more

Ok, enough about Facebook…

How storytelling can enhance the effectiveness of your visualizations

What a great framework for marketer and data expert collaboration.

As the volume and complexity of data collection and storage scale exponentially, creating clear, communicative, and approachable visual representations of that data is an increasing challenge… Leveraging a story structure can help introduce complex visualizations to various audiences. Read more

News Media Should Drop Native Apps

One of the most shared statistics on mobile use is this one: Applications account for 86% of the time spend by users. This leaves a mere 14% for browser-based activities, i.e. sites designed for mobile, either especially coded for nomad consumption, built using responsive design techniques that adapt look and feel to screen size, or special WebApp designs such as FT.com.

This 86/14 split is completely misleading for two reasons: the weight of mobile gaming, and the importance of Facebook. Take a look at this chart … Read more

More on the 86/14…

Apple Watch Doesn’t Have Safari and You Didn’t Even Notice

Web lives, browser dies? The fact that there is no browser on the Apple watch does not mean the end of the web. It does raise the question of exactly what this means to hybrid or web content heavy iOS apps and watch integration though. Read more

I want to invest in your Apple watch app. Here’s why.

I agree, and also still agree with myself. However my initial investment will be in the watch rather than an app. Read more

Android taxonomies and users

Thinking about mobile platforms and demographics?

For reference, and, perhaps, discussion: ‘Android’ means lots of different things, and there’s a lot of confusion about forks, Xiaomi, China and AOSP, as well as ‘the next billion’. So this is how I try to think about this. First, there are actually (at least) six types of ‘Android’ in the market today… In parallel, it’s worth breaking down Android users in a similar way… Read more

Is a Mobile Deep Linking Standard Necessary?

This is not a useful question. It is reasonable to ask whether a successful standard will ever be developed. Standards don’t get created just because they are a good idea, but because they are forced by the market. And that takes time and painful politicking and negotiation between the big players, some influential small players, and more interested parties you would think possible.

We can also ask whether it will continue to be a reasonable expectation for developers to accommodate all the individual “guidelines” from Google, Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Bitly, GE, and whoever else emerges with a reach large or unique enough to make their traffic worth adding to the list of APIs a developer needs to support. Read more

Links

Online vs IRL Retail: Content, Content, Content and… Retail Is NOT All About Selling Product via Medium

A Data-Driven Look at the Open Source E-Commerce Market via CMSWire

22 tips for better data science including helpful suggestion from the pointy haired boss and Dilbert via Data Science Central

And here is some useful advice for dealing with more political challenges… Overcome Your Company’s Resistance to Data via hbr.org

Web geeks: Uncle Sam made a tool that downloads Google Analytics reports & transforms data into JSON… U.S. government launches online traffic analytics dashboard for federal websites via E Pluribus Unum

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year.

Call for Papers now open – Gilbane Conference 2015

The Gilbane Conference 2015 helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders.

Please review the conference and track topics below and submit your speaking proposal. Additionally, answers to the most common questions about speaking at the Gilbane Conference can be found in the Speaker Guidelines.

Deadline for proposals is May 1, 2015

Main Conference Tracks

The conference tracks are organized primarily by role/function as described below. The lists under each track are topic suggestions, and we encourage proposals on relevant topics not listed.

Track C: Content, Marketing, and Customer Experience

Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, social marketers, content marketers, growth hackers, web and mobile content managers, strategists and technologists focused on customer experience and digital marketing.

  • Customer experience management and engagement
  • Multichannel content management and marketing
  • Content strategies
  • Responsive design
  • Adaptive and agnostic content
  • Site optimization
  • Matching content to channels
  • Content marketing
  • Marketing technology landscape, architectures, and platforms
  • WCM and customer experience
  • Marketing technologist roles and practices
  • E-commerce and WCM / mobile app integration
  • Measuring and analytics: Web, mobile, social, big data
  • Avoiding social backlash
  • Personalization – what works, what doesn’t
  • Growth hacking strategies
  • Localization & multilingual content management
  • What function owns customer profiles?
  • What system owns customer profiles?
  • Working with agencies
  • Working with IT
  • Third party data and service integration

Track E: Content, Collaboration and Employee Experience

Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on enterprise social, collaboration, knowledge sharing, and backend content applications.

  • Collaboration tools & social platforms
  • Enterprise social metrics
  • Employee experience management
  • Community building & knowledge sharing
  • Role of content management, intranets, portals, mobile apps
  • Employees are customers
  • Employees are part of the customer experience
  • Content and information integration
  • Enterprise search and information access
  • Taxonomies, metadata, tagging

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Ubiquitous Computing and Digital Transformation

Designed for technology strategists, IT, and marketing / business executives focused on near-term and future software, content, and computing devices to support customer or employee experiences.

  • APIs and customer experience stacks
  • Mobile development frameworks and strategies
  • HTML5
  • Wearable computing and the web
  • Hybrid cloud content management
  • Natural language technologies
  • Haptic and gesture interfaces
  • Big data platforms, tools, analytics
  • Real time customer experiences & reality
  • Visualization
  • Open web vs. walled gardens
  • Deep linking and no linking
  • Future of mobile operating systems and platforms
  • Distributed data, distributed apps – mixing up code and data
  • Internet of things and customer experiences

Track P: Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media

Designed for publishing and information product managers, marketers, technologists, and business or channel managers focused on the transition to digital products and managing digital assets.

  • Digital transformation
  • Designing for digital products
  • Business models and monetization
  • Content marketing risks and benefits
  • Mixing owned, earned, and sponsored content
  • Ad technologies and strategies
  • App development strategies
  • Multichannel publishing
  • Web pages vs Cards
  • Tablets vs smartphones
  • Mobile publishing workflows
  • Matching content to channels and devices

Submit your speaking proposal

 

Gilbane Advisor 3.10.15 – We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly

Gilbane Conference 2015 dates & location

Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston, December 1 – 3. New web site and call for papers will be live in a few days.

We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly. We Need a 3rd Mobile OS

Andreessen Horowitz’s Peter Levine makes an interesting case. Note he is talking about an open OS – and what he doesn’t say is that right now the option is the mobile web, which is open, but also has difficulty replicating the same level of user experience of proprietary native apps. The historically dominant tension between open and proprietary is healthy, but proprietary is the natural lead in user experience.

It is an appealing idea that should be encouraged but who is going to create this mobile OS? How will it guarantee the openness described? Andreessen Horowitz could fund development, but how would it grow and survive in the wild? It would be competing with all open and and native OSes and fragments as well as the mobile web. Read more

Speaking of the difficulty of matching app experience on the web…

60fps on the mobile web

Flipboard engineers made some near-term compromises (including accessibility) to achieve 60fps on the web, and explain why and how. This article is a bit technical so you might want to skip if not a developer, but it may be useful just to know this can be done.

In the pursuit of 60fps we sometimes resort to extreme measures. Flipboard for mobile web is a case study in pushing the browser to its limits. While this approach may not be suitable for all applications, for us it’s enabled a level of interaction and performance that rivals native apps. … In a sense, Flipboard for mobile web is a hybrid application. Rather than blending native and web technologies, it’s all web content. It mixes DOM-based UI with canvas rendering where appropriate. Read more

​And because we obviously still have the web to kick around…

Building a better web: The bare necessities

As with CMS-level decoupling, avoiding content-presentation coupling in delivery makes redesigning and rebranding the channel a lot easier. It also facilitates repurposing across channels and platforms… Most people believe this has already been solved. After all, that is the purpose of CSS. But decoupling HTML content from presentational descriptions is a tricky process. Read more

64 ways to think of a homepage

The focus is on a news homepage but anyone thinking about a site redesign or some tweaking will get some new ideas either directly or provoked by this piece. Something to share with your team to get their design juices flowing. Read more

Internet to neural net – Google search

If search or machine translation are important to you this is a must read since they may provide your first interaction with neural nets or deep learning. Neural nets had a bad rep for a few years because there was not enough processing power to generate the (big) data necessary to prove their promise. Soon neural nets will be behind many products from Google and others. You don’t need a degree in math or science to read this post and understand why. Read more

Additional reading: Facebook AI Director Yann LeCun on His Quest to Unleash Deep Learning and Make Machines Smarter

Bringing Up #Babycore

Cool “avant-garde marketing” for those who get it, or don’t but are curious. Should make you think. Wonder though, whether the self-selected demographic is big enough for them – perhaps the NY segment.

The media architecture of hashtags has always seemed a bit like mom jeans, a botched attempt at fitting in that just doesn’t fit right. So when one of the marketing geniuses who was able to convince the world that mom jeans were a good idea puts a giant billboard in the center of New York City without any of the technologies used to bridge online and off, what are we to think? … There are no hand holds, no footnotes revealing the message for those who don’t get it, and no hashtags guiding your confused IRL self into the oracle of digital space. Read more

Speaking of modern marketing…

Gut instinct marketing at Google

Say what? Is your marketing organization struggling with debates over how much to focus on hard data science or soft gut instinct? Lorraine TwohillSVP Global Marketing at Google believes in both and what she has to say may help your internal discussions.

Google has a very data-led culture. But we care just as much about the storytelling and the brand… And with the use of the analytic tools we have, the storytelling becomes more important than ever. If anything, there’s too much talk about the science right now. I have a colleague who is writing a paper on the future of marketing: it’s data, data, science, science. I’m like, “It’s not!” Or rather, it is those things, yes. But if you fall down on the art, if you fail on the messaging and storytelling, all that those tools will get you are a lot of bad impressions. Read more

and now for something a little different…

Spurious correlations for fun and business meetings

Did you know that Apple iPhone sales correlate with people who died by falling down the stairs? or that total revenue generated by arcades (US) correlates with computer science doctorates awarded (US)?

Have a colleague who doesn’t quite get there is a difference between causation and correlation? Or maybe just forgets sometimes? Take them aside and show them some of the funny and nonsensical correlations on this site and have a laugh together – usually a better outcome than springing a few spurious correlations on them in a meeting. But hey, that’s your call. Read more

Links

WCM vs ecommerce platforms – it’s the integrations… The State of Content + Commerce via AlleyWatch

Not link bait… Spreading messages on Twitter: Research on best practices for wording and rhetorical craft via Journalist’s Resource

Is customer experience management a team sport? Is an integrated customer experience hub possible? via Gartner

When you don’t know what to do… Case Studies: Fixing Hacked Sites via Google Webmaster Central Blog

With some good examples… Data Scale – why big data trumps small data via Numeratechoir

The Marketing Tech Landscape isn’t as Scary as you Think via CMSWire

More nuanced views slowly emerging… People are finally worrying about online privacy—and tech firms are already cashing in via Quartz

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year.