Curated for content, computing, and digital experience professionals

Month: September 2008 (Page 1 of 4)

Socialtext Delivers Socialtext 3.0

Socialtext released Socialtext 3.0, a trio of applications including Socialtext People and Socialtext Dashboard, as well as a major upgrade to its Socialtext Workspace enterprise wiki offering. These products are built on a modular and integrated platform that delivers connected collaboration with context to individuals, workgroups, organizations and extranet communities. People are able to discover, create, and utilize social networks, collaborate in shared workspaces, and work productively, with personalized widget-based dashboards. The company also announced Socialtext Signals, a Twitter-style microblogging interface that goes beyond simple “tweets” by integrating both automated and manual updates with social networking context, expanding the company’s business communications offerings for the enterprise. As with its proven Workspace wiki and weblog product, Socialtext will make all of its offerings available on a hosted ASP as well as an on-premise appliance basis. The entire Socialtext 3.0 trio of products is available immediately on the hosted service, and will be made available to appliance customers starting in October 2008. Socialtext 3.0 profile integration with LDAP or Microsoft Active Directory systems enable rapid population. REST APIs for workspace and profile content are now complemented with a Widget architecture and user interface for the creation of enterprise mashups. Productized Connectors are available with Microsoft Sharepoint and IBM Lotus Connections. You can immediately experience this new release in a free trial at http://socialtext.com/

Machine Translation (Finally) Comes of Age

In our Multilingual Communications as a Business Imperative report, we noted the fact that machine translation (MT) has long been the target of “don’t let this happen to you” jokes throughout the globalization industry. Unpredictable results and poor quality allowed humor to become the focus of MT discussions, making widespread adoption risky at best.

On the other hand, we also noted that scientists, researchers, and technologists have been determined to unlock MT potential since the 1950’s to solve the same core challenges the industry struggles with today: cost savings, speed, and linguist augmentation. Although the infamous report on Languages and Machines from the Automatic Language Processing Advisory Committee (ALPAC) published in 1966 discussed these challenges in some depth (albeit from a U.S. perspective), it sent a resounding message that “there is no emergency in the field of translation.” Research funding suffered; researcher Margaret King described the impact as effectively “killing machine translation research in the States.”

Borrowing from S.E. Hinton, that was then, this is now. Technology advancements and pure computing power have made machine translation not only viable, but also potentially game-changing. A global economy, the volume and velocity of content required to run a global business, and customer expectations is steadily shifting enterprise postures from “not an option” to “help me understand where MT fits.” Case in point — participants in our study identified MT as one of the top three valuable technologies for the future.

There’s lots of game-changing news for our readers to digest.

  • An excellent place to start is with our colleagues at Multilingual Magazine, who dedicated the April-May issue to this very subject. Don Osborn over at the Multidisciplinary Perspectives blog provides an excellent summary, posing the question: “Is there a paradigm shift on machine translation?”
  • Language Weaver predicts a potential $67.5 billion market for digital translation, fueled by MT. CEO Mark Tapling explains why.
  • SYSTRAN, one of the earliest MT software developers provides research and education here.
  • And finally (for today), there’s no way to deny the Google impact — here’s their FAQ about the beta version of Google Translate. TAUS weighs in on the subject here.

Mary and I will be at Localization World Madison to provide practical advice and best practices for making the enterprise business case for multilingual communications investments as part of a Global Content Value Chain. But we’re also looking forward to the session focused on MT potential, issues, and vendor approaches. The full grid is here. Join us!

CM Pros Summit in Boston

The Content Management Professionals Association (CM Pros) will once again be holding their annual Fall Summit in conjunction with Gilbane Boston in December. There are details over on our Events blog which I won’t duplicate here, or even better, go right to the source at http://summit.cmprofessionals.org/. If you are a member we hope to see you, and if you are not you can find out about joining on the CM Pros site at http://cmprofessionals.org/

Webinar: New Generation Knowledge Management

Tuesday, October 7th, 2008
11:00am PT / 2:00pm ET


Organizations are faced with critical knowledge management issues including knowledge capture, IP retention, search and discovery, and fostering innovation. The failure to properly address these issues results in companies wasting millions of dollars through inefficient information discovery and poor collaboration techniques. Today’s knowledge management systems must blend social media technologies with enterprise search, access, and discovery tools to give users a 360-degree view of their information assets. This blend is the foundation for new generation knowledge management.
Moderated by Andy Moore, Publisher of KMWorld Magazine, join Senior Analyst Leonor Ciarlone and Phil Green, CTO at Inmagic for a discussion on perspectives from Gilbane’s report on Collaboration and Social Media 2008, the power of Social Knowledge Networks, and an introduction to Inmagic® Presto.
Space is limited, register here!

MuleSource Integrates Intel XML Software Suite

MuleSource announced a collaboration with Intel Corporation to deliver a new offering that provides off-the-shelf integration between Mule and the Intel XML Software Suite. Called Mule Xpack for Intel XML Software Suite – the new offering is a set of instructions and Mule extensions that help to improve XML processing performance for SOA deployments. Taking a new approach to accelerating XML traffic, MuleSource teamed with Intel in a collaboration to bring the Intel XML Software Suite to the Mule ESB, enhancing and offloading XML processing. The Mule Xpack provides Mule integration support for the Intel XML Software Suite, which can be used to support three categories of XML operations: XML Parsing – reads XML documents and makes the data available for manipulation and processing to applications and programming languages; XSLT Transformation – facilitates efficient XML transformations in a variety of formats and can be applied to a full range of XML documents; XPath Evaluations – evaluates an XML Path (XPath) expression over an XML document DOM tree or a derived instance of source and returns a node, node set, string, number or Boolean value. Intel XML Software Suite is a software library providing APIs for C++ and Java on Linux and Windows operating systems, delivering performance for XML processing on industry standard servers and application environments. Designed to take advantage of the Intel Core microarchitecture, Intel XML Software Suite provides thread safe and efficient memory utilization, scalable stream-to-stream processing, and large XML file processing capabilities. http://www.muleforge.org/

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