Curated content for content, computing, and digital experience professionsals

Day: October 19, 2005

EMC to Acquire Captiva

EMC Corporation and Captiva Software Corporation announced a definitive agreement for EMC to acquire Captiva. EMC will pay $22.25 per share in cash, or approximately $275 million net of Captiva’s cash balance. The transaction is subject to regulatory and Captiva stockholder approval, and is expected to be completed in either late 2005 or early 2006. Upon completion of the acquisition, EMC expects to take a charge of approximately $15 million to $20 million for the value of Captiva’s in-process research and development costs. Excluding this charge, the transaction is not expected to impact EPS in the first full year of operation. Captiva focuses on the early stages of information lifecycle management – information capture, digitization and categorization. In addition to tighter integration with Captiva, EMC will continue to develop Captiva software as an open platform as it does with all EMC multi-platform software, including the underlying content management platform. http://www.emc.com,

NewsGator Launches NewsGator Enterprise Server

NewsGator Technologies, Inc. announced that NewsGator Enterprise Server (NGES) has shipped to several clients in various markets throughout the world. An application of RSS aggregation tools, NGES applies all of the benefits of NewsGator’s existing products, services and capabilities behind the firewall for secure and manageable RSS aggregation of both internal and external content. Companies are using NGES “Smart Feeds” function to monitor what’s being said about their brand, their prospects and their competition; others are using NGES to subscribe to existing internal blogs or RSS feeds off of their ERP and other business systems; yet others are creating internal RSS feeds for project management and corporate communications. http://www.newsgator.com

Enterprise blog surveys

We updated our survey on enterprise use of blog, wiki and RSS technology for our presentation on the same subject to a group of documentation and training managers yesterday. With 91 respondents the results are a little more respectable. The only obvious differences from our earlier results were an increase the use or planned use of RSS, and the amount of support provided by IT for blogs, wikis, and RSS. We are not sure if there is real “hockey stick” growth going on here – our results don’t show it – but there just might be. Chris Shipley thinks their numbers show it. Perhaps they do, but we need to know more about the demographics. Our own demographics are very broad and include a sizable non-technical component, which could explain the difference. There was certainly strong interest among the doc and training folks yesterday, but deployment was almost non-existent. The only other sort of relevant survey we are aware of is Technorati’s, but that was aimed at bloggers so is a very different animal.

Based on all the evidence, my inclination is to believe the growth is hockey-stick-like. We’ll try and come to some more concrete conclusions on this in time for our keynote debate on this in Boston next month.

Almost forgot to mention the new Yahoo! White Paper on RSS (pdf). If you thought most internet users knew what RSS was you had better read this.

Addendum: Here is more info on the demographics and methodolgy we were looking for re the Guidewire/Edelman survey mentioned by Chris Shipley we referenced above.

Enterprise blog surveys

We updated our survey on enterprise use of blog, wiki and RSS technology for our presentation on the same subject to a group of documentation and training managers yesterday. With 91 respondents the results are a little more respectable. The only obvious differences from our earlier results were an increase the use or planned use of RSS, and the amount of support provided by IT for blogs, wikis, and RSS. We are not sure if there is real “hockey stick” growth going on here – our results don’t show it – but there just might be. Chris Shipley thinks their numbers show it. Perhaps they do, but we need to know more about the demographics. Our own demographics are very broad and include a sizable non-technical component, which could explain the difference. There was certainly strong interest among the doc and training folks yesterday, but deployment was almost non-existent. The only other sort of relevant survey we are aware of is Technorati’s, but that was aimed at bloggers so is a very different animal.
Based on all the evidence, my inclination is to believe the growth is hockey-stick-like. We’ll try and come to some more concrete conclusions on this in time for our keynote debate on this in Boston next month.
Almost forgot to mention the new Yahoo! White Paper on RSS (pdf). If you thought most internet users knew what RSS was you had better read this.
Addendum: Here is more info on the demographics and methodolgy we were looking for re the Guidewire/Edelman survey mentioned by Chris Shipley we referenced above.