Curated content for content, computing, and digital experience professionsals

Day: January 10, 2005

CMS Watch Release 7th Edition of “The CMS Report”

CMS Watch released their semi-annual update of “The CMS Report”. The key findings of the report include: Mid-market vendors now offer comprehensive Web content management packages that are typically easier to implement than those from enterprise-tier players; A new class of mid-market “challengers” can provide XML-based solutions, often for less than US$40,000 in licensing; Major USA-based CMS vendors have seen only limited success selling Web content management tools in Europe, where national and regional suppliers have snapped up most large accounts; Although feature sets are converging across CMS vendors, underlying technical architectures continue to diverge in important ways; Different vendors also follow highly distinct user-interface models, and; There are no predominant Web content management suppliers in the marketplace, which means prospective buyers face a confusing set of alternatives – nevertheless, a little diligence can yield good choices. The 7th Edition of The CMS Report provides updated analysis and 4-10 page comparative product surveys of 31 Web content management offerings as well as short descriptions of more than 15 other packages across 7 product categories. New vendors added in this edition include IBM, SiteCore A/S, and Refresh Software. Other vendors covered include Microsoft, Documentum, Interwoven, FileNet, Vignette, Stellent, Day, OpenText, Percussion, Serena, RedDot, Ektron, Tridion, FatWire, Mediasurface, PaperThin, and Atomz. The report is available for purchase online from CMS Watch http://www.cmswatch.com.

DataPower Updates XA35 XML Accelerator

DataPower announced the availability of firmware release v3.1 for its DataPower XA35 XML Accelerator. The latest version of the product expands the benefits of hardware acceleration to applications that make use of XML schema, XML parsing, XSLT 2. 0 and XPath 2.0. Firmware release v3.1 release allows the XA35 to accelerate not just the XML messages themselves but also the XML schemas associated with the messages. A brand new XML Schema engine improves the performance of XML parsing and schema validation. V3.1 also includes Java object support for J2EE-based XML applications and support for transforming XML into binary messages (via DataGlue option). Also included are multiple enhancements for the user interface including the Control Panel for overall management, wizard-like interface to facilitate XML accelerator creation, logging drill-down, and enhanced troubleshooting tools. The XA35 XML Accelerator is a member of DataPower’s XML-aware networking product family, which includes the XS40 XML Security Gateway, the XI50 XML Integration Appliance and the XG4 XML Chipset for OEMs. DataPower’s firmware release v3.1 for the DataPower XA35 XML Accelerator is available immediately. www.datapower.com

Is Anyone Still Talking about DRM Transactional Infrastructure?

Bill Trippe’s post on January 04, 2005, “ECM and Business Process Management,” and the discussion emerging from Bill Zoellick’s post on January 08, 2005, “Sarbanes-Oxley: Too Narrow?” (especially comment by Glen Secor) make me think about the issue of DRM transactional infrastructure. Glen Secor’s comment, especially, while framing the compliance issue more usefully in regard to effective implementation strategies, also helps highlight the significant challenge ahead for DRM (or, in Glen’s usage, ERM, for enterprise rights/[business]rules management).

When the scope of integration becomes as wide as Glen argues it must, it seems to me that the DRM infrastructure requires ubiquity. After all, what we’re talking about is governing content not just between and among departments within an enterprise, but also among partners, suppliers, regulators, and a dozen other categories of participant that aren’t necessarily easily anticipated. The good news is that the DRM approach to security, compliance, and business process integration of content is theoretically flexible and applicable—arguably the best single strategy to show up to date. The bad news may be that theory will move to practice only when a sufficient DRM transactional infrastructure emerges.

But what is a sufficient DRM infrastructure? At best it would be one or a number of trusted environments that provide ubiquitous business rule transaction management common to all participants, so that enterprises could concentrate on defining and associating the business rules needed with all types of content. Since DRM platforms must not only accept and manage rules associated with content, but handle financial transactions and regulatory demands (among other things), and since the advantages of electronic commerce brings with it fast-changing relationships and conditions, the best solution is to use a DRM system in which all others can and will participate.

There are reasons for hope, albeit, perhaps, not in regard to a quick-to-emerge DRM ubiquitous infrastructure. XML-based common meta-data structures provide portability and platform independence to a large degree, and there have been some early efforts toward defining DRM meta-data with XML (ContentGuard’s XrML being the best known, but hardly the only effort). In short, the general industry trend toward abstracting meta-data above platforms means that DRM in the enterprise already has some applicable structure. However, apart from some limited examples—Authentica and Adobe come to mind—there’s still not much in the way of DRM “editorial interfaces” (i.e., rules definition and association) for content management. Fortunately, there’s little barrier to the creation and improvement of such interfaces, and preferably within CM platforms themselves.

But the question remains: is widespread compliance, security, and business processes associated with content likely without a general infrastructure such as the “Trusted Environment” on the Intertrust model? There are plenty of small- and mid-sized companies that won’t be able to afford particular DRM solutions that are not generally addressable. There is a great amount of work left to do to bring DRM into the enterprise, and while some pieces of the puzzle are in place or on their way, I wonder if the lack of working generalized trust environments remains the missing necessary piece for all sorts of “content governance” implementations.

Is Anyone Still Talking about DRM Transactional Infrastructure?

Bill Trippe’s post on January 04, 2005, “ECM and Business Process Management,” and the discussion emerging from Bill Zoellick’s post on January 08, 2005, “Sarbanes-Oxley: Too Narrow?” (especially comment by Glen Secor) make me think about the issue of DRM transactional infrastructure. Glen Secor’s comment, especially, while framing the compliance issue more usefully in regard to effective implementation strategies, also helps highlight the significant challenge ahead for DRM (or, in Glen’s usage, ERM, for enterprise rights/[business]rules management).

When the scope of integration becomes as wide as Glen argues it must, it seems to me that the DRM infrastructure requires ubiquity. After all, what we’re talking about is governing content not just between and among departments within an enterprise, but also among partners, suppliers, regulators, and a dozen other categories of participant that aren’t necessarily easily anticipated. The good news is that the DRM approach to security, compliance, and business process integration of content is theoretically flexible and applicable—arguably the best single strategy to show up to date. The bad news may be that theory will move to practice only when a sufficient DRM transactional infrastructure emerges.

But what is a sufficient DRM infrastructure? At best it would be one or a number of trusted environments that provide ubiquitous business rule transaction management common to all participants, so that enterprises could concentrate on defining and associating the business rules needed with all types of content. Since DRM platforms must not only accept and manage rules associated with content, but handle financial transactions and regulatory demands (among other things), and since the advantages of electronic commerce brings with it fast-changing relationships and conditions, the best solution is to use a DRM system in which all others can and will participate.

There are reasons for hope, albeit, perhaps, not in regard to a quick-to-emerge DRM ubiquitous infrastructure. XML-based common meta-data structures provide portability and platform independence to a large degree, and there have been some early efforts toward defining DRM meta-data with XML (ContentGuard’s XrML being the best known, but hardly the only effort). In short, the general industry trend toward abstracting meta-data above platforms means that DRM in the enterprise already has some applicable structure.

However, apart from some limited examples—Authentica and Adobe come to mind—there’s still not much in the way of DRM “editorial interfaces” (i.e., rules definition and association) for content management. Fortunately, there’s little barrier to the creation and improvement of such interfaces, and preferably within CM platforms themselves.

But the question remains: is widespread compliance, security, and business processes associated with content likely without a general infrastructure such as the “Trusted Environment” on the Intertrust model? There are plenty of small- and mid-sized companies that won’t be able to afford particular DRM solutions that are not generally addressable. There is a great amount of work left to do to bring DRM into the enterprise, and while some pieces of the puzzle are in place or on their way, I wonder if the lack of working generalized trust environments remains the missing necessary piece for all sorts of “content governance” implementations.