Author: Bill Trippe (page 1 of 23)

North Plains Releases New Version of TeleScope Digital Asset Management System

North Plains, LLC announced version 9 of their Digital Asset Management (DAM) system TeleScope, a release focused on helping companies build and manage the digital asset platforms. TeleScope 9 securely connects everyone who needs to work on, distribute, or use digital content no matter where they are. The major enhancements to TeleScope 9 to achieve this include: An HTML5 user interface designed to be easily usable by anyone, at any point in the digital asset lifecycle. Drag and drop of files accessed in TeleScope via a browser directly into desktop applications, simplifying and speeding critical manual editorial or distribution tasks; TeleScope Orchestration, a user-friendly visual workflow engine; Multilingual enhancements to fully support left-to-right and right-to-left language presentations, as well as the ability to see asset metadata in two or more languages side-by-side for international distributed teams. TeleScope is available as either software-as-a-service (SaaS) or installed on premise. http://www.northplains.com/

SpringCM Launches New Version with Eye on Mobility, Collaboration

SpringCM announced the latest release of its cloud enterprise content management platform. This latest release features new case management capabilities, helps SpringCM customers deliver more consistent execution, enhance team productivity and increase management visibility of key business processes. In addition, mobile support for iPad uses intuitive-gesture interface, but also gives access to cloud capabilities such as full-text search of corporate-content repositories. Other highlights include: Enhances quality-of-service and compliance with defined rules; Provides a status view to all case participants to improve team and customer communication; Faster responsiveness to objectives and process changes; Enables more effective internal collaboration on cases; Improves communication with customers and other service requesters; and it requires minimal IT resources. http://www.springcm.com/

Really Strategies Announces RSuite Cloud

Really Strategies announced the availability of RSuite Cloud, a web-based editorial and production system for automated multilingual publishing to print, web, and eBook formats.  RSuite Cloud is a hosted end-to-end content management and publishing system for book publishers to create, manage, and distribute single-source content to multiple channels. The system also provides language translation tools to publish in 70 languages, including all major European, Asian, and bidirectional languages.

RSuite Cloud is available on a per-user license or Pay-Per-Page model. Pay-Per-Page is a payment model where the software is free of charge and the publisher only pays for final pages published from the system.

RSuite Cloud accepts Microsoft Word manuscripts into the system and automatically converts the Word files to XML for web-based copyediting and automated page composition. Production workflows can be set up to generate page proofs and eBook drafts for content review and approval. The system is configured to automatically publish print-ready PDF files, HTML output, and eBook formats. http://www.reallysi.com/

The Future of Book Publishing – New York Public Library Roundtable

Hosted by Kodak, this event was lively and informative.

As Kodak noted in their announcement:

"The future of book publishing is irrevocably changing. With the advent of e-books and other ongoing changes in the retail marketplace, the ability to print books as efficiently as possible becomes even more important. Book publishers, manufacturers, authors, distributors and other key stakeholders in the book value chain are all impacted by the industry’s fast-changing business environment, all seeking to improve efficiencies and develop new markets and revenue opportunities."

 

Apple, eBooks, and the Long Tail Publisher

David Guenette has some cautionary thoughts for the publisher who–quite naturally–will be intrigued by Apple’s new services for publishers being brought to market by Jouve and Innodata-Isogen.

Why Aren’t Publishers Moving to XML Repositories More Quickly?

As we start to delve into some of the interim results of our survey of book publishing professionals, there is a great deal of good data to mull over. While the results are preliminary (and we welcome your participation here), some trends are emerging.

One interesting set of data points surround how publishers are viewing XML, how extensively they work with it, and what technologies they are using to support the management of the XML. Among those using XML, it’s significant that only about half have invested in some kind of storage mechanism specifically for XML, including both relational databases and dedicated XML repositories such as Mark Logic server.

While that overall number might or might not be so striking, I am struck by what some publishers feel is a barrier to adopting an XML repository, namely, the “Challenge of building XML knowledge, skills, or awareness.”  This trumped more traditional barriers to technology adoption such as cost and the maturity of the technology and would seem, on balance, to be a solvable problem.

 

Upcoming Workshop: Managing Smart Content: How to Deploy XML Technologies across Your Organization

As part of next week’s Gilbane Boston Conference, the XML practice will be delivering a pre-conference workshop, “Managing Smart Content: How to Deploy XML Technologies across Your Organization.” The instructors will be Geoff Bock, Dale Waldt, Bill Trippe, Barry Schaeffer and Neal Hannon–a group of experts that represents decades of technical and management experience on XML initiatives.

A tip of the virtual hat to Senior Analyst Geoff Bock for organizing this.

Smart content holds great promise. First with SGML and now with XML, we are marking up content with both formatting and semantic tags, and adding intelligence to electronic information. Using richly tagged XML documents that exploit predefined taxonomies, we are developing innovative applications for single source publishing, pharmaceutical labeling, and financial reporting. By managing content snippets in a granular yet coherent fashion, these applications are revolutionizing our capabilities to meet business needs and customers’ expectations.

What’s working and why? What are the lessons learned from these innovative applications? Does the rapid growth of web-based collaborative environments, together with the wide array of smart content editors, provide the keys to developing other business solutions? There are many promising approaches to tagging content while doing work. Yet we still face an uphill battle to smarten up our content and develop useful applications.

In this workshop, we the five members of the Gilbane practice on XML technologies will share our experiences and provide you with practical strategies for the future. We will address a range of topics, including:

  • The business drivers for smart content
  • Some innovative content management techniques that make authors and editors more productive
  • The migration paths from ‘conventional’ documents to smart content
  • How to apply industry-specific taxonomies to tag content for meaning
  • The prospects for mash-ups to integrate content from disparate application communities

We will discuss both the rapidly developing technologies available for creating, capturing, organizing, storing, and distributing smart content, as well as the organizational environment required to manage content as business processes. We will identify some of the IT challenges associated with managing information as smart content rather than as structured data, and map strategies to address them. We invite you to join the conversation about how best to exploit the power of XML as the foundation for managing smart content across your organization.

Once Upon a Time…

… there was SVG. People were excited about it. Adobe and others supported it. Pundits saw a whole new graphical web that would leverage SVG heavily. Heck, I even wrote a book about it. 

Then things got quiet for a long time…

However, there are some signs that SVG might be experiencing a bit of a renaissance, if the quality of presentations at a recent conference is a strong indication. It’s notable that Google hosted the conference and even more notable that Google is trying to bigfoot Microsoft into supporting SVG in IE, a move that would substantially boost SVG as an option for Web developers.

So a question for those out there interested in SVG. Where are some big projects out there? Are there organizations creating large bases of illustrations and other graphical content with SVG? I would love to talk to you and learn about your projects. You can email me or comment below.

UPDATE: Brad Neuberg of Google, who is quoted in the InfoWorld article linked above, sent along a link to a project at Google, SVG Web, a JavaScript library that supports SVG on many browsers, including Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Safari. According to the tool’s website, using the library plus native SVG support, you can instantly target ~95% of the existing installed web base.

UPDATE: Ruud Steltenpool, the organizer for SVG Open 2009, sent a link to an incredibly useful compendium of links to SVG projects, tools, and other resources though he warns it is a little outdated.

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