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Tag: Gilbane Group

Gilbane Group Announces New Practice to Help Enterprises Leverage XML Technologies and Business Solutions

Gilbane Group Inc. announced the launch of a new practice area dedicated to helping organizations of all types utilize XML technologies and best practices. Well-known industry expert and long-time Gilbane associate Bill Trippe will be the practice’s Lead Analyst. Trippe is joined by industry veterans and Gilbane senior analysts Leonor Ciarlone and Mary Laplante. Gilbane’s XML Technologies and Content Strategies Practice is designed for IT and business managers who need to gain control of critical content, increase collaboration across enterprise applications, improve efficiencies through faster and more flexible information distribution between business partners and customers, and implement new business models that can keep pace with today’s internet-speed competitive requirements. The amount of XML content being generated today is staggering, as large infrastructure providers like Microsoft, IBM, Google, Oracle, and others offer tools and technologies that generate and manage XML information, While many organizations are taking advantage of XML within departmental applications, most companies are not even close to taking advantage of the XML information being created and utilized by popular applications including office software and database repositories. Significantly, many executives are unaware of the XML content and data that are untapped assets within their organizations. To learn more about Gilbane Group’s XML Consulting and Advisory Practice, visit the group’s new blog at https://gilbane.com/xml

 

The News in Retrospect

When I was much younger, I lived in Upstate NY and was vexed by a certain Gannet Newspaper whose news wasn’t particularly current. I always said that their motto should be “the news in retrospect”.

Now I do some writing in the form of this blog and am embarrassed to admit that my report on the recent Gilbane Conference in SanFrancisco would be covered by the same motto. Age makes us humbler with every passing year.

I was very pleased with the quality of presentations in this year’s Publishing Track. In his recent post, Thad McIlroy was much too modest in his depiction of his impressive Future of Publishing Website. The result of almost 10 years of hard work, the site is a fascinating compendium of past and current views of the future of publishing. It is impressive in its scope, organization, and innate wisdom. We were honored to have it released to the public at our conference.

Thad did his usual outstanding job in leading a panel that gave a crisp and concise view of what is possible today in the world of publishing automation. As publishers, Thomson and O’Reilly distinguished themselves with the processes they are using today and products that resulted from those processes. Their willingness to completely rethink their strategies and re-engineer their processes should prove an inspiration to other publishers.

As you can see from my previous post on We are Smarter than Me, I am very interested in activities at the intersection of communities and publishing entities. Our Panel with representatives of San Diego Union Tribune, MERLOT, and Leverage Software gave vivid examples and insights as to how communities can develop valuable new information or enhance traditional information products. Their talks further fueled my curiosity and thinking on this topic.

Bill Rosenblatt led a great Panel of representatives from Adobe, Mark Logic, Marcinko Enterprises, and Quark through an excellent discussion of how today’s technology can enable publishers to design and implement processes that support true cross media publishing. And then Bill shared the lessons that were learned in an innovative cross-media strategy project that he did with Consumer’s Union. He was joined by Randy Marcinko who cited several clear examples of how the proper processes support cross media publishing and By Chip Pettibone Safari U’s Vice President of Product Development who dazzled the audiance with some of Their new products and business models . Their Rough Cuts and Short Cuts product lines are particularly impressive!

Finally Thad’s posting speaks glowingly of the panel for the International Publishing panel. I concur!!
Thanks to all conference panelists and attendees!! Please send me any comments and critiques that would make the next conference more valuable to you.

Gilbane Group Announces Expansion: New Analysts, New IT Blogs, New Consulting Practices

Gilbane Group Inc. announced the completion of the first phase of its planned expansion for 2007. In the first quarter of this year, the Gilbane group has added three new analysts, four new consulting practices, and six new analyst blogs.

Enterprise Search expert Lynda Moulton, Collaboration expert Geoffrey Bock, and Web Content Management expert Tony White join the Gilbane roster of industry veterans: New Enterprise Search Practice & Blog – Lead Analyst Lynda Moulton covers enterprise search and information access technologies and applications at https://gilbane.com/search_blog/; New Collaboration Practice & Blog – Lead Analyst Geoffrey Bock covers tools and practices for business collaboration, including the use of “social media” tools such as blogs and wikis at https://gilbane.com/collaboration/; New Globalization Practice & Blog – Lead Analyst Leonor Ciarlone and Mary Laplante with Contributor Kaija Poysti cover content globalization & localization at https://gilbane.com/globalization/; New Web Content Management Practice & Blog –Lead Analyst Tony White covers web content management technologies and strategies at https://gilbane.com/web_content_management_blog/; New Publishing Technology & Strategy Blog –Our existing Publishing Practice led by Steve Paxhia, with Senior Analysts Bill Trippe, Bill Rosenblatt, and Thad McIlroy now has a blog to complement their service at https://gilbane.com/publishing_blog/; and our New Industry News Blog seamlessly continues our 8-year coverage of hype-free information and content management technology news, but with added “Web 2.0” features for finding, organizing and sharing news at https://gilbane.com/news/.

In addition to growing the analyst team to meet the increasing demand for reliable information and advice on the information technology areas they cover, the Gilbane group has built a new platform for collaborating with customers and partners using enterprise blog technology. The new platform includes tagging, comments, trackbacks, and topic-oriented newsfeeds, allowing Gilbane Group analysts to collaborate more dynamically, and combined with the Gilbane series of conferences and webinars, to do so all year round. Analyst biographies, contact information, and links to all Gilbane Group content are at https://gilbane.com.

Update: In 2012 the multiple blogs were consolidated into the Gilbane blog. Links above have been updated and point to the closest relevant categories.

Good Will and Responsibility

If you signed up for feeds from this site, new posts have been slow coming. Gilbane’s announcement of an Enterprise Search Practice has not gone unnoticed. The past two weeks have resulted in more good will than this analyst could easily digest and filter. The good news is that ideas for posting on “enterprise search” are already accumulating faster than they can get written, and the number of enthusiastic well-wishers is encouraging. It looks like we have an audience and community of practice in the making. Thank you to all who have sent their support and good cheer.

Quite a number of responses have come from companies who want to discuss their technology offerings and positioning. At Gilbane we are following up on those requests and beginning to schedule time for discussions and presentations. With the recognition that vendors/suppliers of technologies want ink, and plenty of it, comes a responsibility of which I am acutely aware because I was one of that community for over 20 years. Having founded, in 1980, and lead an integrated library automation firm in the corporate arena, I know how industry press coverage can make or break the fortunes of even the best offerings. While blogs are intended to launch and promote discussions, even play devil’s advocate, I don’t take this role lightly. Every good intention and hard work by vendors deserves thoughtful and unbiased consideration. It deserves to have analysts who know what they are talking about, and those that would present what they can fairly assess in a useful context. The very definition of analyst (noun) supposes a responsible action, to analyze (verb) the offerings. While my analysis may not focus on what a vendor wants me to consider, it will try to present information that is both helpful and thought-provoking without being mean-spirited or dismissive, and content that helps potential users of the technology focus their own choices and decisions.

Now it’s time to get down to business and start making this a more frequent happening. Based on a number of comments, let’s begin with clarifying what we mean by enterprise search at Gilbane. While the marketplace often categorizes enterprise search as a specific kind of search product, we at Gilbane don’t. Any technology that serves any type of enterprise by helping it find electronic or physical content through an electronic search interface is fair game. Enterprise search is about looking for content in the organization or for the organization. It may be embedded in a specialized application, may be a platform designed to collectively search and aggregate content from many internal silos, or it may combine search of desktops, enterprise hard drives and the Internet. There is a very big universe of content out there; enterprises need all the search tools they can (afford to) leverage to harvest what they need and when they need it.

Now this analyst’s job is to give you a balance between what the vendors are saying and offering, and what the users really need, and get the two engaging more effectively with each other.

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