Archive for Facebook

Gilbane Advisor 3-26-18 — Facebook (duh!), Google & news, personal data, IAB & GDPR

This is so much bigger than Facebook

The Facebook / Cambridge Analytica scandal is Facebook’s most serious crisis so far because it exposes the particular weakness of their business model at a time, and in a way, that can no longer be ignored by those who understood it, namely, investors and paying customers. There is no obvious fix that does not reduce Facebook’s value. And then there are the Facebook users paying with ‘only’ personal data – how many of these will now become woke? And what will they do? As Ethan Zuckerman, points out though, and the reason I singled out his excellent article, the problem is much bigger.

… Zuck didn’t mention that Facebook’s business model is based on collecting this demographic and psychographic information and selling the ability to target ads to people using this data about them… This is a known bug not just for Facebook and other social networks, but for the vast majority of the contemporary web. Read More

Duopoly not all-powerful?

eMarketer estimates that the combined Google and Facebook share of the digital ad market will shrink from last year’s 58.5% to 56.8% in 2018 “as smaller players such as Amazon and Snapchat are experiencing faster-than-expected growth.” Also, Google and Facebook’s share of new digital ad dollars is declining… This year, they will garner nearly 48% of new expenditures.” Down from almost 73% in 2016. Read More

Facebook vs Google share US ad spend

Google News Initiative

Google has been more successful than Facebook in working with publishers. And of course they need to be, for all the same reasons they need to support the Open Web. This week they launched the Google News Initiative to pull together all the relevant projects and partnerships into a coordinated effort and are committing $300m to fund the activity over the next three years. Self-interested of course, but lots to applaud here. Read More

Eager to sell your personal data?

Should marketers pay consumers directly to access their personal data? The idea isn’t new but it’s become more popular as people see the huge profits that Google, Facebook, and others make from using that data, as consumers become more aware of the data trade, and as blockchain technology makes low cost micro-payments a possibility.

David Raab takes a look at the current vendor marketplace, and reaches the realistic conclusion that “You’ll have to wait”. Good advice. Read More

Why the IAB GDPR Transparency and Consent Framework is a non-starter for publishers

The IAB and IAB Europe, which are charged with representing a much broader set of stakeholders including hundreds of ad tech companies, Google, Facebook, Oath, and many others with significant intermediary interests, has released its plan to handle the GDPR roll-out. The IAB framework, which was submitted for industry commenting, was clearly designed by ad tech companies and included endorsement from 23 ad tech companies and, most notably, zero publishersRead More

Also…

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for content, computing, and digital experience professionals. We focus on strategic technologies. We publish more or less twice a month except for August and December. See all issues

Gilbane Advisor 1-30-18 — Molecular content, beyond bitcoin, ML data value, Facebook “platform”

Molecular content & the separation of concerns

The creation and management of content continues to increase in complexity as we need to design for nmachines in addition to n screens. Content Strategist Michael Andrews lays out why we need to move beyond, single sourcing and modular content.

Atom Design methodology by Brad Frost

Michael proposes an approach based on “molecular content” combined with the concept of the “separation of concerns”. A good read for anyone involved in content strategy. Read More

Beyond the Bitcoin bubble

As most of you know, the really interesting thing about Bitcoin is not the actual currency but the Blockchain architecture it is built on. And while we don’t cover financial technology, Blockchain is very much applicable to the information management technologies and applications we do focus on, for example in publishing or marketing. On a grander scale, a trustable distributed ledger of X that competes with or complements a trusted (or not) central authority of X has broad societal implications. One of these is the walled garden threat to the Open Web. And sure enough, there are serious efforts underway to build /rebuild a sustainable Open Web using Blockchain technology. Steven Johnson has written a non-technical article that provides an excellent explanation of what you need to know and why. Read More

Is your company’s data actually valuable in the AI era?

In the AI economy, the value of your accumulated data is limited to a one-time benefit from training your AI model. And the value of training data is, like oil or any other input, influenced by the overall supply — it’s less valuable when more people have it. In contrast, the value of your ongoing operational data is not limited to a one-time benefit, but rather provides a perpetual benefit for operating and further enhancing your prediction machine. Read More

Maybe Facebook should abandon the news feed altogether

Facebook has almost always wanted to be a platform, if not The Platform. Their recent shift away from news in their news feed back to mostly social interactions raises questions about their long-term future and what kind of platform they will be. John Battelle has an interesting suggestion. He admits it is a long shot, but his thoughts aren’t as crazy as he suggests his solution might sound…

What if Facebook *really* pivoted, and became a … truly neutral platform — an AWS for attention and identity, if you will. What if the company dedicated itself to a set of stable policies that encouraged other companies to tap into its social graph, its vast identity database, its remarkable engagement machinery? Read More

Also…

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for content, computing, and digital experience professionals. More or less twice a month except for August and December. See all issues

Gilbane Advisor 5-3-17 — SaaS era, Watson vs Einstein, e-commerce AI, FB monopoly

Why the SaaS era of journalism will be our most exciting yet

During the first quarter century of the commercial internet, digital journalism has already gone through three eras: the portal years, the search years, and the social years. Each era advanced storytelling and presented new revenue streams, but I would argue that digital journalism is now entering its most exciting period yet. Think of this as the stories as a service era, where journalism will be paid for by readers, for readers… Digital journalism has been commoditized, creating new market opportunities at the bottom of a new disruption curve that is not yet “good enough”. (italics added). Read More

The SaaS era - Stories as a Service

Parsing the IBM Watson and Salesforce Einstein deal

But aren’t Watson and Einstein competing? In short, the deal is about more data; it’s a complementary marriage of Watson’s broad unstructured data capability and Salesforce’s structured data focus on their application and customer experience. Well, that’s what caught my interest anyway. But there is more to it and James Governor sorts it out… Read More

How Germany’s Otto uses artificial intelligence

Otto is the largest e-commerce merchant in Germany after Amazon. Their use of AI goes beyond pure marketing to reduce shipping, returns, and inventory costs, and improves customer experience. An instructive example of what is already being done with machine learning, and without human hands on, their system…

analyses around 3bn past transactions and 200 variables (such as past sales, searches on Otto’s site and weather information) to predict what customers will buy a week before they order… has proved so reliable—it predicts with 90% accuracy what will be sold within 30 days—that Otto allows it automatically to purchase around 200,000 items a month from third-party brands with no human intervention. Read More

How our publisher tracked down his online troll and changed our comments for the better

MIT Technology Review is determined to keep the value of comments alive. Jason Pontin reports on his efforts and current strategy in this thoughtful and thorough piece. Read More

Facebook and the cost of monopoly

Facebook may have a monopoly in social networking, and while that may be a problem for Snap or any other would be networks, Facebook would surely argue that … society as a whole shouldn’t be too bothered… The problem is that Facebook isn’t simply a social network: the service is a three-sided market — users, content providers, and advertisers — and while the basis of Facebook’s dominance is in the network effects that come from connecting all of those users, said dominance has seeped to those other sides… Facebook passed Google as the top traffic driver back in 2015, and as of last fall drove over 40% of traffic for the average site, even after an algorithm change that reduced publisher reach… So is that a monopoly when it comes to the content provider market? I would argue yes, thanks to the monopoly framework above. Read More

Also…

The history of Instant Articles’ path to Instant Recall, via The Verge

For fun and profit… Alexa learns to talk like a human with whispers, pauses & emotion via TechCrunch

Nobody is going to own podcasting. Well, at least there’s that. via Doc Searls

New technologies’ second order effects… Ten Year Futures via Benedict Evans

Staggering numbers natch… How Google builds web frameworks via freeCodeCamp

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Conference: November 28–29
Workshops: November 30
Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel

Gilbane Digital Content Conference

The Call for Speakers is Open!

Deadline is June 2, 2017

Frank Gilbane’s Gilbane Advisor curates content for content, computing, and digital experience professionals. More or less twice a month.

Gilbane Advisor 1-27-17 — Apple Facebook dance, platform battles

The Great Unbundling

We’ve seen the different ways the internet unbundled print and music. TV is evolving, or at least unbundling, more slowly. Ben Thompson has been tracking this for some time. In his latest look he focuses on TV and how Facebook, Snapchat are contributing to its unbundling. This is not just about commercial TV but video and advertising in general. Read More

Speaking of video, just as Facebook is starting to pushing long form video…

Parse.ly finds users not that engaged with video

Parse.ly examined the performance of four types of posts within its network of 700 sites: long-form, short-form, video, and slideshows. Read More

engagement time performance by content type - via Parse.lySlide by Parse.ly 

The iPhone Unsung Sine Qua Non

Telecommunications companies have historically been masters of control, and their tight grip has often slowed down their own, and other industries’, progress. While Apple has some control issues of their own, their wresting substantial control from the carriers has opened up huge opportunities not just for them, but for everyone. Control, however, is never a permanent state, and shifts are often unforeseen.

In retrospect, the ascendency of Smartphone 2.0 and the way it has shaped our culture seems obvious and natural. But the celebration and contemplation overlooks a crucial Sine Qua Non, a necessary (but not sufficient) condition: Unlocking the carriers’ grip on handset specifications, marketing, and content distribution. Read More

​Speaking of control…

The coming war between Apple and Facebook

Facebook has been phenomenally successful in mobile advertising. But they have long chafed at their dependence on the dominance of the only two mobile platforms that matter, Apple and Google. All three companies are jockeying for platform, content, and advertising control. Mobile marketing strategists need to track this, and Eric Seufert provides a rewarding deep dive that focuses on the Apple Facebook dance. Facebook is hoping messaging can replace operating systems as a more level platform battlefield. Read More

Speaking of messaging apps as platforms…

Tencent launches ‘mini programs’ for WeChat

WeChat is still leading the messaging-as-platform push and are who to watch first. Even though they “only” have some 800 million users in China they may lead in engagement time. WeChat ‘mini programs’ compete with Google ‘instant apps’, all app stores, and of course Facebook Messenger and other messaging products. Read More

Blockstack’s Vision to Reinvent the Web for Better Privacy

Based on blockchain technology as you might guess. The approach is one to watch and there are many companies working on it.

…instead of needing to create accounts with each site, as people do with Google or Facebook, users of sites built on Blockstack’s system will control their own digital identity (or identities). To use a site that needs your information, you will grant access to a profile under your control alone. If you want to stop using a service, you can revoke its access to your profile and data and take it elsewhere. Read More

Also…

On Their Tenth Anniversary, Mobile Apps Start Eating Their Own and of course are also threatened by ‘mini programs’, ‘instant apps’ and bots. via Flurry Analytics

On Medium 1: Jessica Lessin… What Everyone Is Missing About Media Business Models via The Information

On Medium 2: Frederic Filloux… A New Model for Medium via Monday Note

Would be fascinating to have comparable survey of U.S citizens… 70% of Europeans Aren’t Willing to Sacrifice Privacy for New Services, Survey Reveals via Tripwire 

I love quiet, but there is a cost. Think about this… Our Silent Future via The Information

Businesses are people too! and deserve a good CX and DX… Measuring B2B’s digital gap via Mckinsey

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals. Subscribe to our newsletter, or our feed.

Gilbane Advisor 9-14-16 – Next computing platform, FB, Google, and Daily Beast

Dear Readers: 

Hope you had a fantastic summer. We are back from vacation and our new school-year resolution is to publish more bite-sized issues more frequently – tougher curation and quicker delivery to you.

Beyond the iPhone

is the watch, as the next general purpose personal computer that is. I still think that has always been Apple’s plan, with fitness a viable commercial entry point and learning path to the much larger health care market and everything else. In this regard the AirPods were the most interesting of the recent announcements. As Ben Thompson points out…

… one of the devices that pairs with AirPods is the Apple Watch, which received its own update, including GPS. The GPS addition was part of a heavy focus on health-and-fitness, but it is also another step down the road towards a Watch that has its own cellular connection, and when that future arrives the iPhone will quite suddenly shift from indispensable to optional. Simply strap on your Watch, put in your AirPods, and, thanks to Siri, you have everything you need… just as the iPhone makes far more sense as a digital hub than the Mac, the Watch will one day be the best hub yet. Read More

Facebook’s Power Struggle Over App Links

This long slow cold war requires monitoring by marketers, developers, and publishers. The Information’s Cory Weinberg is watching.

Apps are caught in the middle of a power struggle between Apple, Google and Facebook to control mobile browsing habits. The fragmentation benefits Facebook, which keeps people inside its browser instead of supporting apps’ deep links on iPhones. Read More

Google’s AMP Viewer: the Tinder UX for content?

Google is also increasing its reach and control over the browsing experience. All marketers, not just news publishers, will be affected.

AMP links will no longer be limited to the Top Stories area of mobile results; instead, Google will link to the AMP version of a webpage any time a valid AMP is available. This “blue links” expansion will dramatically increase AMP traffic overall and enable discovery of a rapidly growing universe of non-news and long-tail AMP content. … Publishers might not realize that Google won’t just link to AMPs, but will present them in a Google-hosted viewer which is certain to alter user flow and engagement from mobile search. Read More

How The Daily Beast gets 40 percent of readers to visit its homepage

While the Beast gets its fair share of traffic from Google and Facebook, it focuses more on getting those readers back via email (its subscriber base has doubled in the past year) and its app than on maximizing the reach of content it publishes elsewhere. It has eschewed Google AMP and, after a brief dalliance with Facebook Instant Articles, has stopped using those too. Read More

Also…

“Basically, we have two problems with CX: complexity and perspective.”… The cash model of “customer experience” via Doc Searls

Handy… Introducing the Bots Landscape: 170+ companies, $4 billion in funding, thousands of bots via Venturebeat

NYT and WaPo just edged out Buzzfeed and Huffpost for the most digital readers… Revenge of the ‘legacy’ sector via Politico

The front-end needs the back-end… Digital Experience and Content Operations Need More Attention via EContent

Why are deep neural networks good at solving complex problems? Is the secret buried in the laws of physics? via Technology Review

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Main conference: November 29 – 30
Workshops: December 1, 2016
Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals. Subscribe to our newsletter, or our feed.

Gilbane Advisor 5-30-16 – Content, Commerce and Deep Links

Deep links and Android Instant Apps

Benedict Evans picks up on something important for Google. From his newsletter… Cartoon from xkcdxkcd - Content, Commerce Deep Links

… the new Instant Apps feature for Android is hugely important. If you tap on a deep link anywhere on Android, then that app itself will immediately be downloaded from the app store and start running, and show you the piece of content linked to … This effectively removes the ‘is the app installed or not when we link to it?’ problem, letting people experience an app seamlessly without bouncing out to the app store and opening up huge new opportunities for engagement (and advertising). It also challenges a major premise behind chat bots (they don’t require you to install a new app). Read More 

Content publishers underestimate the “shoppable content” challenge

You would think by now two of the major components in marketing technology stacks, content management and e-commerce systems, would be more widely and successfully integrated. In most cases the main roadblock remains organizational. But the combination of revenue requirements and competitive seamless buying experiences will eventually force change. This could be another capability led and controlled by social and computing platforms. Publishers and e-commerce sites need to get moving to at least influence the outcome. Read More

Facebook testing “shoppable” video ads

Facebook needs to prove to retail marketers that it can drive sales, not just provide brand exposure. One way to do that is by launching “shoppable” video ads next month so people can browse products without tapping out of a video ad. Read More

Google tests feature that lets media companies, marketers publish directly to search results

AMP pages may get preferential treatment because they are fast, but this experimental feature treats the search results page as a publishing channel – take that Facebook News Feed!

Google has built a Web-based interface through which posts can be formatted and uploaded directly to its systems. The posts can be up to 14,400 characters in length and can include links and up to 10 images or videos. The pages also include options to share them via Twitter, Facebook or email. Each post is hosted by Google itself on a dedicated page, and appears in a carousel in results pages for searches related to their authors for up to a week, … After seven days, the posts remain live but won’t be surfaced in search results. Rather, they can be accessed via a link. Read More

Google open sources SyntaxNet and English parser

… we spend a lot of time thinking about how computer systems can read and understand human language in order to process it in intelligent ways. Today, we are excited to share the fruits of our research with the broader community by releasing SyntaxNet, an open-source neural network framework implemented in TensorFlow that provides a foundation for Natural Language Understanding (NLU) systems. Our release includes all the code needed to train new SyntaxNet models on your own data, as well as Parsey McParseface, an English parser that we have trained for you and that you can use to analyze English text. Read More

Despite stumbles, news outlets flock to Messenger

The Takeaway – News organizations looking for fresh ways to reach readers see big potential in Facebook’s Messenger “bots.” But early efforts have not done well, and news publishers are still experimenting with the platform to figure out what users want to see. Read More

End of the online advertising bubble

Kalkis Research are not the first to predict the end of the ad bubble, but their compelling report pulls no punches and has caused quite a stir with its dire predictions. They have been responding to some of the comments and the whole bit is useful. Read More

Gilbane Digital Content Conference
Main conference: November 29 – 30
Workshops: December 1, 2016
Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston

Short takes

Big step for Medium. Looks good but are they ready for the slippery slope of formatting support?… How to Make Your Publication Look Great via Medium

Watch out for the The Non-Monetizable Product Blind Spot via The Information

Very welcome feature… Tie your sites together with property sets in Search Console via Google webmaster blog

Good type design is worth the effort… How typography can save your life via Pro Publica

Probably good for EPUB… W3C and International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) explore combining via w3c.org

As it should be… 85 percent of Facebook video is watched without sound via Digiday

HTTP/2 Server push rolling out… Get Ready to See Seconds Shaved Off Web Page Load Times via Technology Review

How many martec vendors does it take to…? Did Morgan Stanley just kill the single-vendor marketing suite? via chiefmartec.com

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals. Subscribe to our newsletter, or our feed.

The Gilbane Digital Content Conference: Content Management, Marketing, and Digital Experience helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and technologies to produce superior digital experiences for customers, employees, and partners.

Gilbane Advisor 2-29-16 — Google, Facebook, and the open web

The platform competition for last mile content delivery continues to ramp up. Google’s AMP has launched and is available to everyone; Facebook’s Instant Articles becomes available to all on April 12th; and both have gained some open web credibility in the last week. Platform publishing is no longer only for major publishers. Anybody with a blog or website needs to pay serious attention to how platform publishing will affect their reach. Content strategists and marketers need to dial in.

The good news is that in many cases it is possible to feed the beasts automatically with no more effort than publishing a post on a blog, and keep control of your content and web presence. CMS vendors should be ahead of this curve. Our own blog, thanks to WordPress and a few plugins, is already setup to publish to Medium (it works), Google AMP (it works but the rendering is a little funky), and Instant Articles (as soon as Facebook turns the switch in April). We’ll also be testing Apple News.

Google Is Going to Speed Up the Web. Is This Good?

Good for us as web consumers that is. Dan Gillmor provides a non-technical and cautiously optimistic review of Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages).

I still have a million questions about this, and some are the ones I began with: What if Google changes its strategy, by making it more proprietary and centralized? What if news sites had just done the right thing in the first place? Or, since they didn’t, what if they just resolved to build faster pages — using standard HTML markup and loading components in a non-annoying way — now? Wouldn’t that have gone a long way toward solving the problem? Do they, and we, really need all this? … For now, at any rate, the answer seems to be yes. Read More

How Instant Articles helps the open web

This is a remarkable post. RSS dad Dave Winer says that Instant Articles is built on RSS, that he has been in the loop for two years, and can now vouch that it works. This is a very welcome development.

Facebook is using open web technology to power Instant Articles. I’m not sharing anything that isn’t already publicly documented on the Facebook developer site. People have trouble understanding this, I assume, because it seems so out of character for a big web destination like Facebook to care about the open web. It’s kind of a miracle. But there it is. The open web is about to get a real shot in the arm from a most unexpected place. Read More

Aligning Business Goals with User Goals in Content

Is content marketing ‘heading toward a “trough of disillusionment” following a period of “inflated expectations.”’? It already has for some. This thoughtful post by Michael Andrews digs into how unrealistic expectations happen and how to avoid them.

… One erroneous assumption is to believe that  a group who shares a common personal goal are equally likely to buy something.  Conversely, just because a group of people all want to buy a certain type of product or service, that doesn’t mean they share the same purchase motivations or care about the exact same features or benefits. Read More

Branding in the Age of Social Media

Douglas Holt argues for an alternative to branded content.

It turns out that consumers have little interest in the content that brands churn out. … Most view it as clutter—as brand spam. When Facebook realized this, it began charging companies to get “sponsored” content into the feeds of people who were supposed to be their fans. …celebrities are all garnering the superengaged community that pundits have long promised social media would deliver. … That shouldn’t be surprising… What works for Shakira backfires for Crest and Clorox. The idea that consumers could possibly want to talk about Corona or Coors in the same way that they debate the talents of Ronaldo and Messi is silly. Read More

What’s Next in Computing?

Chris Dixon does a really nice job with this. Accessible, to the point, and I agree the next era will be multimodal. A good historical perspective post to share with c-suite colleagues.

I tend to think we are on the cusp of not one but multiple new eras. The “peace dividend of the smartphone war” created a Cambrian explosion of new devices, and developments in software, especially AI, will make those devices smart and useful. Many of the futuristic technologies discussed above exist today, and will be broadly accessible in the near future. Read More

A good companion piece…

On Bots, Conversational Apps and Fin

Sam Lessin with a developer and investor perspective on what’s next…

2016 is being declared the year of bots. And it feels like there is a broad shift in the developer ecosystem away from traditional point-and-click apps, towards chat-based user interfaces. … It’s happening because there is broad consumer and developer fatigue with apps. Consumers don’t want to install or use new traditional apps. … The bet I am making, both as an investor and operator, is that the 2016 bot paradigm shift is going to be far more disruptive and interesting than the last decade’s move from Web to mobile apps… If the app shift moved developers away from server side development and towards clients, the most important part of the current shift is a move back towards the server and away from client software in the form of bots. Read More

The End of Streams

Jessica Lessin has some interesting thoughts on what I think is more like the comeback of channels.

There has been a quiet shift in product design away from streams and towards channels, and the shift is likely to accelerate with messaging platforms. Read More

Is Holistic Customer Experience Management even Possible?

Scott Liewehr is talking about SAP in this post, but raises the general question, and pointing out that products aren’t enough if your partners are not in sync – and why should they be?

I’ve thought for years that when SAP decided to jump into the Customer Experience race, it would be game-over for many other vendors. Now that they have, I’m not so sure. I see that their customer experience strategy has a greater dependence on service provider partners than they’ve ever had, and it’s not obvious to me as to which partners are going to be interested in helping them succeed in this realm. Read More

Mark your Calendar!

Gilbane Digital Content Conference 2016
Content Management, Marketing, and the Digital Experience

Main conference: November 29 – 30 ● Workshops: December 1
Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston, MA

Short takes

Too much “thought leadership” and personalization… Avoid These Common B2B Content Marketing Mistakes via hbr.org 

Is digital advertising is becoming a rather simple proposition: Facebook, Google, or don’t bother?… The Reality of Missing Out via stratechery

Bill Thompson channels Karl Popper, but don’t be scared… The Open Web and Its Enemies via Medium

Internet of Things security is so bad, there’s a search engine for sleeping kids and it (Shodan) has been around for years. via ars technica

News Publishers Need To Jump Into Bots Will this provide the added value they need? via Monday Note

For some of you, but streaming is mainstreaming… Open Source Streaming Analytics at the Edge for Internet of Things Devices via prnewswire

CMS, etc., corner

DAM Market growth, Adam… Digital Asset Management Round-Up, February 2016 via Digital Clarity Group

More on DAM… Updated DAM research: ADAM, Nuxeo, Bynder, Canto, WebDAM, NetX, WAVE, and MerlinOne via Real Story Group

Amazon and Colis Privé, Gilt Group, Hudson’s Bay, Groupon… E-Commerce Round-Up: January 2016 via Digital Clarity Group

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year. You can also subscribe via our feed.

The Gilbane Conference on Content, Technology, and Customer Experience helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior digital experiences for all stakeholders.

Gilbane Advisor 1-7-16 — 16 Mobile Theses

Happy New Year!
We’ve been busy with December’s Gilbane Conference and the holidays, so to get caught up and keep this issue a reasonable size we have collected conference content in a separate blog post, and included a larger Short Takes section below.

16 Mobile Theses

Benedict Evans summarizes his view of fundamental issues at the intersection of mobile and computing. There are links to more detailed analysis which should be read to fully understand his position.

We’re now coming up to 9 years since the launch of the iPhone kicked off the smartphone revolution, and some of the first phases are over – Apple and Google both won the platform war, mostly, Facebook made the transition, mostly, and it’s now perfectly clear that mobile is the future of technology and of the internet. But within that, there’s a huge range of different themes and issues, many of which are still pretty unsettled. Read More

and see…

Contextual Runtimes

Fred Wilson on Evans’ 16 mobile theses…

… my favorite part is titled “Post Netscape, post PageRank, looking for the next run-time.” In this part Ben describes what used to be the dominant environment and the search for what is next. At the end he states: “Really, we’re looking for a new run-time – a new way, after the web and native apps, to build services. That might be Siri or Now or messaging or maps or notifications or something else again.” … I agree with Ben but I think there won’t be one runtime in the mobile era. I think what is emerging is multiple runtimes depending on the context – “contextual runtimes.”

Fred is right, and further, some runtimes will be open and some closed. This tension between “open” and “closed” has been a constant of computing systems and standards for decades and has fed creative development of both. Context determines the leverage of “open” or “closed” and is fluid. Read More

and see…

Mobile Counter-theses

Tim Bray on Evans’ 16 theses…

I think the the­ses are about half wrong. … I’ll run through his the­ses one-by-one. But first, I think our dif­fer­ences cen­ter on two things; one that’s pre­dictable giv­en who I am, name­ly the cloud. The sec­ond is per­haps sur­pris­ing: Whether key­boards mat­ter.

After trying to come up with my own tally of who was more correct, I would go further than Tim and say that their backgrounds account for a lot of the apparent difference. At the risk of over-simplifying, Benedict is an analyst from the telecom market which now includes client computing products, and Tim is a developer with deep involvement in web, mobile and enterprise systems. In any case, you’ll want to read what both have to say. Read More

Rating the Crowd-Sourced Marketing Software Review Sites

What began as a whimsical “landscape of landscapes” led me to realize crowd-sourced review sites are the most common type of vendor directory, accounting for 15 of the 23 sources listed in my original graphic. This begged for a deeper look at the review sites to understand how they differ which, if any, could replace the work of professional reviewers (like me)…

Marketing technology consultant and analyst David Rabb helpfully checks out his crowd-sorting competition and happily finds a role for experts like himself and crowd-sourced reviews. Read More

Is Facebook Driving Less Traffic to Publishers’ Sites?

Recent data from content measurement firm SimpleReach… said Facebook referral traffic to a group of 30 publishers’ sites dropped 32% between January and October… The 30 sites analyzed were those in SimpleReach’s network deemed most reliant on Facebook for their traffic… But online analytics firm Chartbeat… aggregated information from 100 “major news and media” sites … found Facebook referral traffic remained relatively consistent between January and October.

A third firm saw a slight increase in Facebook referral traffic in the same time frame.It seems it depends who you ask. We’ll be learning more in 2016. Read More

“Why not be all the way in?” How publishers are using Facebook Instant Articles

The quote above is from the enthusiastic Washington Post, who doesn’t seem to need any help with the speed of its site these days. Read More

You can also see what some other publishers, including the New York Times and Harvard Business Review think about Instant Articles in the video of the recent Gilbane conference session on New Frontiers in Digital Content Distribution.

Why Facebook Still Worries About Android

Yes, even Facebook has platform fear. The Information’s Amir Efrati reports…

This summer, conversations between Google and Facebook sparked concern at the social media company. The issue: whether Google would eventually ask Facebook to pay for various app requests made by Facebook users on Android smartphones. … These app requests included Google Maps information viewed within the Facebook app and app-related push notifications to be delivered to the phone. Google’s servers handle such app requests before they are passed on to the network provider and end up on an Android phone. … Google doesn’t charge mobile app developers for such standard services. But on Android, Facebook is the top user of such API calls, … And handling those calls costs Google money. Read More

What is Facebook doing about it? Lots… 

Facebook’s Android Contingency Planning

Facebook has been secretly preparing contingency measures to allow its apps to operate on Android phones without going through Google’s app store, … Facebook’s goal is to be ready in case it has an intractable conflict with Google … over future rules governing how apps can function on Android. Read More

Short takes

Summary with handy links… Gartner, IDC and Forrester on the Future of Digital Transformation via What’s The Big Data?

Insight on AMP in interview with Richard Gingras… Inside Google’s plan to speed up the mobile Web via Poynter

2016 predictions for mobile marketing, by a newly discovered business-savvy developer via Mobile Dev Memo

The management tool everyone has been waiting for?… Introducing Guesstimate, a Spreadsheet for Things That Aren’t Certain via Medium

You need to read to understand why a post with such a title actually delivers. How to get rich in tech, guaranteed. via Startups and Shit 

Biting, funny, and true… How to Swallow $200 Million Accidentally via Medium

Slippery slope… 350 Words — Ad — 150 Words via Medium

Why is social media failing? Because The Consumer isn’t a Moron, at least in general. via Medium

Bet you didn’t know that Email Is the Best Way to Reach Millennials via HBR

Handy for getting started with some IoT market research… Internet of Things (IoT) Market Ecosystem Map via Medium

Hiring help… Identifying the essential skills for data scientists. Beyond the Venn diagram via oreilly.com

Digital Asset Management Round-Up, December 2015… SAP hybris / CELUM, Canto / inMotionNow, and some predictions for 2016 via Digital Clarity Group

Updating Our Search Quality Rating Guidelines includes a link to a major revision of Google’s rater guidelines. via Google Webmaster Central Blog

E-Commerce Round-Up: November 2015… Multichannel challenges at Macy’s, Nordstrom, Target, service provider ambitions at Zalando and Farfetch, and Mercadolibre growth. via Digital Clarity Group

CMS, etc. corner

WCM market share estimates… Web Content and Experience Management – Industry Maps via Real Story Group

What’s New for You This December in Open Source CMS… Liferay, Hippo, Typo3, Telerik, Enonic, dotCMS, eZ Systems, Jahia, Magnolia, Umbraco, Xoops… via CMSWire

What’s New This January in Open Source CMS… Composite C1, Enonic, Joomla, Hippo. via CMSWire

WordPress or No? WCMS – the WordPress problem as we have experienced it via diginomica

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