Archive for Facebook

Gilbane Advisor 1-7-16 — 16 Mobile Theses

Happy New Year!
We’ve been busy with December’s Gilbane Conference and the holidays, so to get caught up and keep this issue a reasonable size we have collected conference content in a separate blog post, and included a larger Short Takes section below.

16 Mobile Theses

Benedict Evans summarizes his view of fundamental issues at the intersection of mobile and computing. There are links to more detailed analysis which should be read to fully understand his position.

We’re now coming up to 9 years since the launch of the iPhone kicked off the smartphone revolution, and some of the first phases are over – Apple and Google both won the platform war, mostly, Facebook made the transition, mostly, and it’s now perfectly clear that mobile is the future of technology and of the internet. But within that, there’s a huge range of different themes and issues, many of which are still pretty unsettled. Read More

and see…

Contextual Runtimes

Fred Wilson on Evans’ 16 mobile theses…

… my favorite part is titled “Post Netscape, post PageRank, looking for the next run-time.” In this part Ben describes what used to be the dominant environment and the search for what is next. At the end he states: “Really, we’re looking for a new run-time – a new way, after the web and native apps, to build services. That might be Siri or Now or messaging or maps or notifications or something else again.” … I agree with Ben but I think there won’t be one runtime in the mobile era. I think what is emerging is multiple runtimes depending on the context – “contextual runtimes.”

Fred is right, and further, some runtimes will be open and some closed. This tension between “open” and “closed” has been a constant of computing systems and standards for decades and has fed creative development of both. Context determines the leverage of “open” or “closed” and is fluid. Read More

and see…

Mobile Counter-theses

Tim Bray on Evans’ 16 theses…

I think the the­ses are about half wrong. … I’ll run through his the­ses one-by-one. But first, I think our dif­fer­ences cen­ter on two things; one that’s pre­dictable giv­en who I am, name­ly the cloud. The sec­ond is per­haps sur­pris­ing: Whether key­boards mat­ter.

After trying to come up with my own tally of who was more correct, I would go further than Tim and say that their backgrounds account for a lot of the apparent difference. At the risk of over-simplifying, Benedict is an analyst from the telecom market which now includes client computing products, and Tim is a developer with deep involvement in web, mobile and enterprise systems. In any case, you’ll want to read what both have to say. Read More

Rating the Crowd-Sourced Marketing Software Review Sites

What began as a whimsical “landscape of landscapes” led me to realize crowd-sourced review sites are the most common type of vendor directory, accounting for 15 of the 23 sources listed in my original graphic. This begged for a deeper look at the review sites to understand how they differ which, if any, could replace the work of professional reviewers (like me)…

Marketing technology consultant and analyst David Rabb helpfully checks out his crowd-sorting competition and happily finds a role for experts like himself and crowd-sourced reviews. Read More

Is Facebook Driving Less Traffic to Publishers’ Sites?

Recent data from content measurement firm SimpleReach… said Facebook referral traffic to a group of 30 publishers’ sites dropped 32% between January and October… The 30 sites analyzed were those in SimpleReach’s network deemed most reliant on Facebook for their traffic… But online analytics firm Chartbeat… aggregated information from 100 “major news and media” sites … found Facebook referral traffic remained relatively consistent between January and October.

A third firm saw a slight increase in Facebook referral traffic in the same time frame.It seems it depends who you ask. We’ll be learning more in 2016. Read More

“Why not be all the way in?” How publishers are using Facebook Instant Articles

The quote above is from the enthusiastic Washington Post, who doesn’t seem to need any help with the speed of its site these days. Read More

You can also see what some other publishers, including the New York Times and Harvard Business Review think about Instant Articles in the video of the recent Gilbane conference session on New Frontiers in Digital Content Distribution.

Why Facebook Still Worries About Android

Yes, even Facebook has platform fear. The Information’s Amir Efrati reports…

This summer, conversations between Google and Facebook sparked concern at the social media company. The issue: whether Google would eventually ask Facebook to pay for various app requests made by Facebook users on Android smartphones. … These app requests included Google Maps information viewed within the Facebook app and app-related push notifications to be delivered to the phone. Google’s servers handle such app requests before they are passed on to the network provider and end up on an Android phone. … Google doesn’t charge mobile app developers for such standard services. But on Android, Facebook is the top user of such API calls, … And handling those calls costs Google money. Read More

What is Facebook doing about it? Lots… 

Facebook’s Android Contingency Planning

Facebook has been secretly preparing contingency measures to allow its apps to operate on Android phones without going through Google’s app store, … Facebook’s goal is to be ready in case it has an intractable conflict with Google … over future rules governing how apps can function on Android. Read More

Short takes

Summary with handy links… Gartner, IDC and Forrester on the Future of Digital Transformation via What’s The Big Data?

Insight on AMP in interview with Richard Gingras… Inside Google’s plan to speed up the mobile Web via Poynter

2016 predictions for mobile marketing, by a newly discovered business-savvy developer via Mobile Dev Memo

The management tool everyone has been waiting for?… Introducing Guesstimate, a Spreadsheet for Things That Aren’t Certain via Medium

You need to read to understand why a post with such a title actually delivers. How to get rich in tech, guaranteed. via Startups and Shit 

Biting, funny, and true… How to Swallow $200 Million Accidentally via Medium

Slippery slope… 350 Words — Ad — 150 Words via Medium

Why is social media failing? Because The Consumer isn’t a Moron, at least in general. via Medium

Bet you didn’t know that Email Is the Best Way to Reach Millennials via HBR

Handy for getting started with some IoT market research… Internet of Things (IoT) Market Ecosystem Map via Medium

Hiring help… Identifying the essential skills for data scientists. Beyond the Venn diagram via oreilly.com

Digital Asset Management Round-Up, December 2015… SAP hybris / CELUM, Canto / inMotionNow, and some predictions for 2016 via Digital Clarity Group

Updating Our Search Quality Rating Guidelines includes a link to a major revision of Google’s rater guidelines. via Google Webmaster Central Blog

E-Commerce Round-Up: November 2015… Multichannel challenges at Macy’s, Nordstrom, Target, service provider ambitions at Zalando and Farfetch, and Mercadolibre growth. via Digital Clarity Group

CMS, etc. corner

WCM market share estimates… Web Content and Experience Management – Industry Maps via Real Story Group

What’s New for You This December in Open Source CMS… Liferay, Hippo, Typo3, Telerik, Enonic, dotCMS, eZ Systems, Jahia, Magnolia, Umbraco, Xoops… via CMSWire

What’s New This January in Open Source CMS… Composite C1, Enonic, Joomla, Hippo. via CMSWire

WordPress or No? WCMS – the WordPress problem as we have experienced it via diginomica

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our conference community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals throughout the year. You can also subscribe via our feed.

The Gilbane Conference on Content, Technology, and Customer Experience helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders.

Do Google Yourself – Preserving and Protecting your Companies Online Reputation

With The Gilbane Conference just a few short months away, I’ve been thinking a lot about the evolution of themes and topics covered over the past few years. This year we are pleased to have a session lead by Russ Edelman and Toby Bell on Two Key Management Concerns About Social Media :ROI and Reputation Management. This is an increasingly important subject especially when it comes to the enormous impact online reputation has not just on an individual but a company as well.

15 Minutes. 15 Minutes is all it takes for an angry customer to chip away at the integrity of your businesses’ reputation by casting an instant smear campaign across all of your social networks. In some cases that 15 minutes is a generous figure as today’s internet users are more savvy than ever ,especially when motivated by what they deem to be an unfair experience.

Kasio Martin, a self proclaimed internet professional and blogger recently related in one of her entries how a series of bad experiences with local businesses and the subsequent online smear campaigns she launched against them received very different responses, prompting both positive reactions and further negative behavior from her.

“After the bad transaction I googled the business again. I left negative reviews on Insider Pages, City Search, Yahoo, Google Pages and Yellow Pages. These review sites outranked the businesses own Facebook Page in Google. The next time someone googles that business they will find my review 5 times before they get any other information about the company. This took me about 15 minutes to accomplish.”

The part of this scenario that strikes me the most is not just the short amount of time it took this customer to cause a major headache for the offending business, but also that the popularity of these sites she targeted make them the first picks in online search results. The company’s lack of response to her complaints showed even less integrity as it showed they either had a poor social media strategy or none at all. As to the effect they had on the business itself there is no mention but one can imagine that it served as a major discouragement towards attracting new customers.

Ms. Martin recounts an additional story in which her online complaints against a large chain restaurant were not only heard but resolved before the day was through:

“Because the restaurant was a large corporate chain, I didn’t really expect anything to come of it. But I received an email response within the hour. They informed me that they were getting that store on the phone and fixing this immediately. . . Within only a couple of hours they responded to me on Twitter and offered to help. . . Before the end of the workday they had resolved the issue and I didn’t have a bad thing left to say on any channel.”

While the Ms. Martin’s of the world may scare the faint of heart away from attempting to grow their business through social media, both scenarios show that regardless of whether or not you have made pages on these sites, that a Social Reputation is being made for your company whether or not you’re the one facilitating it.

Social Reputation can not be ignored, but it can be preserved and even strengthened through early intervention and constant diligence.

Here are a few Do’s and Don’ts for getting you started:

  • Do Google yourself: This is simply the easiest way to find what’s being said about your company around the entire internet. For faster results try signing up for Google alerts for your company.
  • Do check your @mentions on Twitter and Wall on Facebook: See what’s being said about you both good and bad in seconds. This is a great public forum to address questions, comments and complaints from your customers.
  • Don’t ignore negative online comments: While the easiest solution to a jaded customer review may be to delete it or simply ignore it, this sends an undeniable message to others that either you don’t care enough to answer the complaint or that you’re not on top of your online presence at all.
  • Don’t let third party sites and blogs outrank your own in search results: If third party pages such as yelp, hub pages, and Wikipedia are the first returns when someone searches for your company then your customers/potential customers will receive biased opinions before they even make it to your own site. Stay active on all of your websites and social media outlets and you’ll be sure to have your companies mission and services heard first and foremost.

And finally,

Don’t let negative opinions get in the way of your business’s goals: There will always be critics of the work you do and the worst thing you can do is let it get in the way of the doing a good job. Stay true to your companies mission and purpose and ultimately that work will speak for itself, hopefully in the form of good reviews for a positive Social Reputation.

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For more information on the Gilbane Conference please visit our website @:

http://gilbaneboston.com/12/index.html

To read more about Russ Edelman and Toby Bell’s Session at Gilbane Boston you can find out more @:

http://gilbaneboston.com/12/conference_program.html#c4

http://gilbaneboston.com/12/speakers.html

 

Welcome Social Media Marketing Manager Mary Stevens!

We are very pleased to welcome Mary Stevens to the Gilbane Conference team as Social Media Marketing Manager. Mary is already active on our social channels and someone you’ll be hearing a lot from as conference activity ramps up.

In addition to keeping our social channels updated on conference and related activity Mary is a resource for conference attendees, sponsors, speakers, fans, who follow or want to engage and network with the Gilbane conference community. She’ll be updating you more specifically on what that means to you, but in general, she’ll be facilitating communication, conversations, and networking among all stakeholders. For example, we’ll be publishing speaker social media links to help attendees learn more about our speakers in advance of the event.

Mary can be reached via email; she can be found on our Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn pages and groups (buttons below); you can follow her posts on this blog (none yet!); and you can DM her at @gilbane or @gilbaneboston.

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