Tag: digital content

Gilbane Digital Content Conference Call for Speakers Deadline is May 6

Gilbane Digital Content Conference

Main conference: November 29 – 30
Workshops: December 1
Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston, MA

Share your expertise and network with peers and digital content leaders…

Tracks include:

Content, Marketing, and Customer Experience

Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, social marketers, content strategists, web content managers, content marketers, content creators and designers, business and technology strategists focused on customer experience and digital marketing.

Focused on how to overcome challenges and implement successful strategies and practices to reach, engage, and retain customers with superior content and digital experiences.

Content, Collaboration, and Digital Workplace Experience

Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on intranets, enterprise search, social, collaboration, knowledge sharing, and internal, field, and backend content applications.

Focused on tools and practices for building agile, information rich, collaborative, and distributed digital workplaces to meet the demands of modern organizations and the changing workforce.

Technologies for Content, Marketing, and Digital Experience

Designed for technology strategists and executives focused on near-term and future software for creating, managing, and delivering compelling digital experiences across platforms, channels, and form factors.

Focused on what you need to know about evolving, and potentially disrupting, content and digital experience technologies for marketing and the workplace.

Re-imagining Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media

Designed for publishing and information product managers, marketers, technologists, strategists, and executives focused on digital transformation, new channels and business models, and managing digital assets.

Focused on the business and technical challenges facing information, publishing, and media organizations creating, managing, and delivering content across the growing number of competing platforms and channels.

About

The Gilbane Conference on Content Management, Marketing, and Digital Experience helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior digital experiences for all stakeholders.

Gilbane Digital Content Conference call for speakers is now open

Call for Speakers

Call for Speakers is Open!

Well-designed content is the core ingredient of competitive digital experiences. And the accelerating pace of technology allows us to dramatically improve content creation, content management, content delivery, and ultimately the customer experience. But this is far from easy, and depending on your goals can require pulling together many components, including web content management / web experience management, new development frameworks, analytics, tag management, social media, and advertising tools, as well as ecommerce, CRM, and other system integrations. The Gilbane Digital Content Conference brings together content strategists and managers, marketers, technologists, IT and business executives, as well as external service providers to learn and share how to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

The Gilbane Digital Content Conference helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders. Please review the conference and track topics below and submit your speaking proposal. Additionally, answers to the most common questions about speaking at the Gilbane Digital Content Conference can be found in the Speaker Guidelines.

Main Conference Tracks

The conference tracks are organized primarily by role/function as described below. The lists under each track are topic suggestions, and we encourage proposals on relevant topics not listed.

Track C: Content, Marketing, and Customer Experience
Focused on how to overcome challenges and implement successful strategies and practices to reach, engage, and retain customers with superior content and digital experiences.

Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, social marketers, content strategists, web content managers, content marketers, content creators and designers, business and technology strategists focused on customer experience and digital marketing.

  • Customer experience management and engagement
  • Content and the customer lifecycle
  • Multichannel content management and marketing
  • Content strategies
  • Responsive design
  • Adaptive and agnostic content
  • Site optimization
  • Matching content to channels
  • Content marketing
  • Marketing technology landscape, architectures, and platforms
  • WCM and customer experience
  • Marketing technologist roles and practices
  • E-commerce and WCM / mobile app integration
  • Measuring and analytics: Web, mobile, social, big data
  • Social marketing
  • Personalization – what works, what doesn’t
  • Growth hacking strategies
  • Localization & multilingual content management an practices
  • What function / system owns customer profiles?
  • Marketing transformation
  • Omnichannel strategies
  • Working with agencies
  • Working with IT
  • Third party data and service integration

Track E: Content, Collaboration, and Digital Workplace Experience
Focused on tools and practices for building agile, information rich, collaborative, and distributed digital workplaces to meet the demands of modern organizations and the changing workforce.

Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on intranets, enterprise search, social, collaboration, knowledge sharing, and internal, field, and backend content applications.

  • Collaboration tools & social platforms
  • Practices for successful collaboration
  • Enterprise social metrics
  • Employee experience management
  • Community building & knowledge sharing
  • Role of content management, intranets, portals, mobile apps
  • Employees are customers
  • Employees are part of the customer experience
  • Content and information integration
  • Enterprise search and information access
  • Taxonomies, metadata, tagging

Track T: Technologies for Content, Marketing, and Digital Experience
Focused on what you need to know about evolving, and potentially disrupting, content and digital experience technologies for marketing and the workplace.

Designed for technology strategists and executives focused on near-term and future software for creating, managing, and delivering compelling digital experiences across platforms, channels, and form factors.

  • APIs and customer experience stacks
  • Mobile development frameworks and strategies
  • Streaming apps and content
  • HTML5
  • Wearable computing and the web
  • Hybrid cloud content management
  • Natural language technologies
  • Haptic and gesture interfaces
  • Data platforms, tools, analytics
  • Real time customer experiences & reality
  • Visualization
  • Open web vs. walled gardens
  • Deep linking and no linking
  • Future of mobile operating systems and platforms
  • Distributed data, distributed apps – mixing up code and data
  • Internet of things and customer experiences

Track P: Re-imagining Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media
Focused on the business and technical challenges facing information, publishing, and media organizations creating, managing, and delivering content across the growing number of competing platforms and channels.

Designed for publishing and information product managers, marketers, technologists, strategists, and executives focused on digital transformation, new channels and business models, and managing digital assets.

  • Digital transformation
  • Designing for digital products
  • Business models and monetization
  • Platforms, publishers, and distribution strategies
  • Content marketing risks and benefits
  • Mixing owned, earned, and sponsored content
  • Ad technologies and strategies
  • App development strategies
  • Multichannel publishing
  • Web pages vs cards
  • Mobile publishing workflows
  • Matching content to channels and devices

Submit your speaking proposal

A Kodak Moment

Last month, I had the privilege of being a guest lecturer at MIT for Howard Anderson and Peter Kurzina’s Course entitled “Managing in Crisis”. I prepared a case study about the current status of the College Publishing market. It included concerns about price pressures, used book competition, channel issues, new competitors and new media requirements, pending legislation about pricing practices, and the continued lack in the growth of unit sales.

The class was composed of 40 or so very bright students who did an excellent job analyzing the case. One student really captured the essence of the case when she said that it reminded her of the photography industry as the major players struggle with the transition from traditional film and paper products to digital photography.

While Kodak moments have long been associated with joyful celebrations, the aforementioned transition has been anything but a celebration. In fact, it is likely that this Kodak moment will come to exemplify the struggles of a powerful corporation as they strive and perhaps even fail due their inability to recognize the customer benefits, opportunities, and challenges associated with non-traditional types of photographic media.

Many publishers are struggling with their own “Kodak Moments”. And I think that the transition issues are similar to the photography industry. First, Kodak seems to have been focused on the products that people had been buying for years and trying to preserve the advantages that their film and paper technologies provided. Like many of us who have had market leading products, they were arrogant about their technology, processes, market position and quality. While they clearly were aware of digital photography technology, they dismissed digital products because the image quality was significantly poorer. Then they concentrated on turning digital photos into traditional photos. It seems to met hat they missed the potential in offering less expensive digital images that could easily be posted on the Internet or e-mailed to relatives.

For many years, publishers offerings have been closely related to technological developments in the Software and Printing industries. For example, software has enabled improvements in authoring, composition, and thereby lowered the costs of elegant or complex page designs. Printing Technology has made four color printing much more affordable and had made shorter print runs economical. These changes have been passed along to consumers of information. (While I understand that there are differences between the terms: content, information, and intellectual property, I will use the term information to subsume all three terms for purposes of brevity) In many cases, they have added value to the customer’s experience but there are cases where formats were enhanced and color offered because they could be rather than because they were beneficial. In reality, I believe that the net result was that the size, format, and frequency of the traditional economical delivery unit EDU (my term) of information (a book, journal, or magazine) were modified by technology advances but the traditional media form has remained essentially the same for 100+ years.

The Internet has presented publishers with a radical paradigm shift ( I don’t like the term either). All types of publishing entities have had to deal with changes in customer expectations that are easily as profound as those experienced by the Photography industry. They don’t just want their information to be more timely and less expensive, they also want their information to concisely answer their questions and seamlessly integrate with their work flows or learning styles.

Perhaps the most significant change is the redefinition of the EDU. In the purely print era, there needed to be a certain mass of information to build a product that would be economical to print and sufficiently valuable to consumers to generate a profit. In manycases, it was assumed that relatively few information consumers would use all of the information that was presented in a single EDU. Rather, the scope of the information (or content) had to be broad enough to attract enough customers without being so broad as to make customers feel that they were procuring too much information that wasn’t pertinent to their interests. Hence, we have witnessed a generation of books where authors and market researchers work closely together.

In the digital world, authors and publishers are potentially freed from the strictures of printing economies. Therefore, information currently found in textbooks, references, magazines and journals can be rendered as as short information objects or more comprehensive content modules. Or publishers can produce information objects or content modules that are not anticipated to ever take book form. The objects can be delivered in many ways including search engines such as Google. These new EDUs can be purchased or licenses separately or mixed and matched to create a course of instruction or a personal reference work. One benefit of these nimbler EDUs is that they blend nicely with software to offer increased value in the form of better instruction or more productive work flows.

The availability of these more compact EDUs will likely spawn many debates concerning academic traditions and learning methodologies that we have come to hold dear. It has long been the practice for students to read and master significant quantities of information with the expectation that many of the specific facts will fade from memory leaving a general understanding of the topic. And many people are considered well read because they have plowed through many traditional EDUs (Books) The question will be: Could one become well educated or well read by learning to explore topics of interest through smaller EDUs and/or what blend of contextual and specific information delivers the best and most productive intellectual outcome. There will be some interesting face-offs between technology enabled active exploration and discovery of information to allow students to pursue topics that they find interesting vs. the more structured mastery of a set of information presented in book form. Of course, it is not an either/or proposition as they methods must eventually be blended to enable meaningful knowledge acquisition.

The digital world has also created a demand for information that is developed and delivered as rapidly as possible. Where traditional publishers often justified their value by guaranteeing the accuracy and authority of their published information, many of today’s information consumers are willing to trade authority for velocity of information and now rely upon other information consumers to tell them what information is the most accurate and useful. Individuals now actively participate in communities that generate and evaluate large quantities of information objects and content modules. The Wikipedia/media organization and the MERLOT community are excellent examples of communities that produce quality information modules.

While many information consumers may still prefer to consume their information in print form, they may now wish to print their own copies or to create and purchase custom versions produced by rapidly improving print on demand technology. To many publishers, the perfectly formatted page has become almost an art form. They consider those pages to have many of the same aesthetic values that Kodak attributed to images produced via their traditional film technologies. Because customers rarely have the choice of formats, it is difficult to gauge the value that they derive from “perfect pages” vs potentially less expensive simpler pages. Chip Pettibone of O’Reilly Publishing reported at the recent Gilbane Conference that when readers of e-books were offered the choice between a simple HTML design and a faithful rendition of the original book page, 50% chose the HTML version and that population seemed to be gaining in numbers. Because books and computer screens represent quite different form factors, the value of the perfect page can actually limit rather that enhance the effective presentation of information in digital formats. Therefore, rather than trying to maintain the integrity of the printed page, modern publishers are designing their content to be presented equally well in a variety of media forms. Publishers that cling to the page metaphor are putting their futures in jeopardy.

This paradigm shift is replete with challenges and opportunities. Many traditional reference products (including Microsoft’s Encarta) have been decimated by new products created in the Internet Era. Newspapers and magazines have had to adapt to the challenges or multiple media environments by creating online products as they have seen their traditional readership dwindle. Journal publishers have had to derive new models to serve their subscriber base. Many categories of trade books now include websites with fancy multimedia elements and discussion groups. I think that some of the most exciting and interesting challenges and opportunities will be found in the world of educational publishing. As witnessed by the decisions of major publishing conglomerates to divest their educational publishing operations, the challenges of mastering the Internet paradigm shift are both daunting and expensive. To succeed, new generations of products will need to be built to take advantage of technology as opposed to being web versions of existing products. Business models will need to be revised and channel strategies re-engineered. One important outcome will be increased information accessibility for readers and learners with disabilities.

Over the next few years, the publishing industry will witness many Kodak moments…. Hopefully the majority will be the old fashioned Kodak moments of victory and celebration.