Curated content for content, computing, and digital experience professionsals

Tag: augmented reality (Page 1 of 2)

GIGXR announces new immersive learning system

GIGXR, Inc., a provider of extended reality (XR) learning systems for instructor-led teaching and training, announced the availability of its GIG Immersive Learning System for the Fall 2020 Northern Hemisphere academic year. The cloud-based System was created to enhance learning outcomes while simplifying complex, real-life teaching and training scenarios in medical and nursing schools, higher education, healthcare and hospitals. The GIG Immersive Learning System is available for demos and pre-order now, and includes three core components:

  • Remote and Socially Distanced Learning: Enables teaching and training with students in a distributed classroom through extended reality. Students can be co-located, remote or safely socially distanced, and participate in sessions anywhere using 3D mixed reality immersive devices and mobile phones, tablets or laptops for a 2.5D experience.
  • Mixed Reality Applications: GIGXR’s products HoloPatient and HoloHuman run on Microsoft’s HoloLens 2, placing the 3D digital world in a collaborative physical space for safe development of clinical skills and exploration into human pathologies and anatomies.
  • Immersive Learning Platform: Cloud-based infrastructure that supports GIGXR’s mixed reality applications and remote learning capabilities with additional features such as visual login, instructor content creation, holographic content management, session planning, roles and rights, license management, security, privacy, and long-term data management.

https://www.gigxr.com/

8th Wall launches Face Effects tool for AR facial animations

8th Wall is launching Face Effects, a new cloud tool that enables developers to create facial effects that wrap around someone’s face using augmented reality technology. The face filter developer tools are based on WebAR, which enables AR experiences to be accessed via a web browser instead of an app. 8th Wall Face Effects is designed to give developers and brands control to create face filters that are interactive, real-time, and that live on their own websites. Beyond WebAR, 8th Wall Face Effects can also be used across all devices (iOS/Android and desktops using a webcam) and benefit from no app required. You just click a link to experience it. Developers can choose the asset types, file sizes, and content to maximize the value for their audience.

Fans could connect multiple users together to create a shared shopping experience, and integrate with developers’ preferred analytics, customer relationship management system, and payment systems in virtual try-on products. Developers can simply scan a QR code to open up a cloud editor that adds a 3D object to your face. The edges of virtual sunglasses can stop at the edge of your face because an occluder prevents it from going right through your face. You can put virtual tattoos on your face to see what they look like before you make them permanent. With 8th Wall Face Effects, developers can anchor 3D objects to face attachment points, render face mesh with face components with textures and shaders, and design custom effects. Similar to 8th Wall’s existing World Effects and Image Target AR, Face Effects supports development with web frameworks such as A-Frame and Three.js.  New developers can sign up for a 14-day free trial of the 8th Wall platform. Existing developers can log in and get started using the Face Effects project templates.

https://www.8thwall.com, h/t: VentureBeat

Gilbane Advisor 6-4-19 — Martech metrics, B2C AR, B2B AR, machine talking

Martech stack metrics

Scott Brinker: “Martech stack utilization is a misguided metric… (when it’s disconnected from value)”. This is certainly true. Products/tools in your stack usually have many features, only a subset of which actually provide value for your needs. Identifying and

Martech stack value

focusing on those features can save resources and provide more accurate ROI calculations. Read More

4 questions retailers need to ask about augmented reality

It seemed like AR was poised for rapid adoption (beyond Pokémon Go) a couple of years ago when apps started appearing from Ikea and others. Indeed I thought so. There has certainly been a lot of activity and some very useful applications, but as usual the use-case specifications, cost justifications, integrations, and learning curve take a time-toll. Bain & Company has some good advice for execs creating or reviewing a plan. Read More

Google announces a new Glass augmented reality headset for B2B

Much of the advice in the Bain article we reference above is also relevant to non-consumer AR applications. Whether B2B AR deployments are ahead of B2C or not, project planning should be informed by research into both. ROI calculations will be very different, but technologies and user experience design considerations largely overlap. Google Glass was a consumer flop but their Enterprise Edition is making some progress and what they are learning is valuable. After all, employees and professionals are consumers too. Read More

Can we trust machines that sound too much like us?

David Weinberger raises a good point. He is not asking whether we can trust machines. He is asking whether we want to loose the trust signals we get from talking with humans when we can’t tell the difference between machine and humans voices. He also wonders about the efficiency and how our preferences will evolve. Human sounding machines will not always be the right choice. Read More

Also…

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for content management, computing, and digital experience professionals. We focus on strategic technologies. We publish more or less twice a month except for August and December.

Gilbane Advisor 1-30-19 — Structured content & robots, website first, AR & Blockchain almost

Conversations with robots: voice, smart agents & the case for structured content

The benefits of structured content have been clear for decades, but the cost and effort to create and manage it limited adoption to complex ‘mission-critical’ applications. Today, there are better tools, more expertise, and a much broader range of business and consumer applications that require structured content to be effective, competitive, cost efficient, and future-ready. Designer Andy Fitzgerald explains why structured content is more important than ever.

voice agents

Illustration by Dougal MacPherson

A useful read for project teams, with illustrated examples helpful for shared understanding. Read More

Why founders should start with a website, not a mobile app

And not just founders, though it is more critical for them. Most startups have few resources, and need to rapidly build a product, customer base, and supporting infrastructure before their money, or investor patience, runs out. Kapwing founder & CEO Julia Enthoven’s description of her startups’ decision cuts to the chase. Read More

Despite limitations, publishers plot more augmented reality for 2019

That bet is motivated by lots of work publishers did last year. The New York Times produced 13 different augmented reality projects in 2018, ranging from an investigation into a bombing in Syria to a visit to the large hadron collider at CERN; Time Magazine launched its first-ever augmented reality issue of its magazine; The Washington Post, which started producing augmented reality content in 2017, continued producing projects in 2018… But augmented reality still faces significant limitations. Read More

Blockchain’s Occam problem

Blockchain has yet to become the game-changer some expected. A key to finding the value is to apply the technology only when it is the simplest solution available. Read More

Also…

 
Gilbane digital experience conference

April 29
– May 1, 2019, Washington DC
Digital experience strategies, technologies, and practices, for marketing and the workplace.

Learn more & use code FG19 for best available price

 

Gilbane Advisor 2-16-18 — Marketing & AI, publishing & AR, blockchain & media, IoT

How is AI disrupting marketing?

An excellent summary from Scott Brinker on the current/near-term reality of “AI” marketing applications. “…here’s the irony: as much as the hype has overstated what AI

Overhyped Marketing Buzzwords | chiefmartec.com

might do formarketing in the next 12-24 months, the reality of how AI is already working in marketing today is often under-recognized.” Tis true. Read More

The NYT is boarding the AR train — here’s what that means for storytelling

One of the areas we’re paying attention to this year is the use of AR content for serious enterprise applications and truly useful consumer use cases. In the case of publishing, The New York Times, Quartz, Axel Springer, and others, are experimenting with how the unique characteristics of AR content can enhance customer experiences rather than distract. As powerful as the AR promise is we don’t know how news consumers will react to the extra, more active, effort involved. But it’s time to find out. Read More

How blockchain could kill both cable and Netflix

Not this week, but there is keen interest in using blockchain technology to build decentralized peer-to-peer content management and distribution applications. There are a number of these kinds of projects planning to go live this year. Rizwan Virk describes much of the collective vision and potential disruption. A good place to start learning more. Read More

Smart homes and vegetable peelers

Andreessen Horowitz’s Benedict Evans doesn’t have a unified vision of the future of smart homes, but he does have some ideas and lots of enlightening questions. In this post he looks at smart home ecosystems and questions smart thing use cases, market dynamics, platform roles, integrations, and how we’ll interface with them. He remains “extremely skeptical” of voice as a new major platform, and rightfully so. This a must read for anyone building or investing in products or businesses around smart things – not just for the home. Read More

Also…

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for content, computing, and digital experience professionals. We focus on strategic technologies. We publish more or less twice a month except for August and December. See all issues

« Older posts