Archive for content strategy

Brand Content Strategies

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Featured session:
Brand Content Strategies

“Content strategy” covers a lot of territory, within organizations, and across industries. While every business is unique, cross-pollinization of ideas often leads to some of the most valuable and unpredictable insights. In this session speakers from well-known brands, Starwood and Volvo, share content strategies that have worked for them, and might inspire you in surprising ways.

Tuesday, November 28: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 p.m.

*Register today to save your seat and use priority code 100FG17 for an extra discount*

Melissa Webster IDC at Gilbane Conference

Moderator:
Melissa Webster, Program Vice President, Content & Digital Media Technologies, IDC

Ora Solomon Starwood at Gilbane Conference

Ora Solomon, Director of Global Product Management, Starwood Hotels & Resorts
Measuring your translation ROI, Starwood’s model

John Johnston, Volvo, at Gilbane Conference

John Johnston, Director, Digital Marketing, Volvo Construction Equipment
Targeting Content for the Right Location

Gilbane Digital Content Conference
Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel, November 28 – 29, 2017

Gilbane Advisor 5-30-16 – Content, Commerce and Deep Links

Deep links and Android Instant Apps

Benedict Evans picks up on something important for Google. From his newsletter… Cartoon from xkcdxkcd - Content, Commerce Deep Links

… the new Instant Apps feature for Android is hugely important. If you tap on a deep link anywhere on Android, then that app itself will immediately be downloaded from the app store and start running, and show you the piece of content linked to … This effectively removes the ‘is the app installed or not when we link to it?’ problem, letting people experience an app seamlessly without bouncing out to the app store and opening up huge new opportunities for engagement (and advertising). It also challenges a major premise behind chat bots (they don’t require you to install a new app). Read More 

Content publishers underestimate the “shoppable content” challenge

You would think by now two of the major components in marketing technology stacks, content management and e-commerce systems, would be more widely and successfully integrated. In most cases the main roadblock remains organizational. But the combination of revenue requirements and competitive seamless buying experiences will eventually force change. This could be another capability led and controlled by social and computing platforms. Publishers and e-commerce sites need to get moving to at least influence the outcome. Read More

Facebook testing “shoppable” video ads

Facebook needs to prove to retail marketers that it can drive sales, not just provide brand exposure. One way to do that is by launching “shoppable” video ads next month so people can browse products without tapping out of a video ad. Read More

Google tests feature that lets media companies, marketers publish directly to search results

AMP pages may get preferential treatment because they are fast, but this experimental feature treats the search results page as a publishing channel – take that Facebook News Feed!

Google has built a Web-based interface through which posts can be formatted and uploaded directly to its systems. The posts can be up to 14,400 characters in length and can include links and up to 10 images or videos. The pages also include options to share them via Twitter, Facebook or email. Each post is hosted by Google itself on a dedicated page, and appears in a carousel in results pages for searches related to their authors for up to a week, … After seven days, the posts remain live but won’t be surfaced in search results. Rather, they can be accessed via a link. Read More

Google open sources SyntaxNet and English parser

… we spend a lot of time thinking about how computer systems can read and understand human language in order to process it in intelligent ways. Today, we are excited to share the fruits of our research with the broader community by releasing SyntaxNet, an open-source neural network framework implemented in TensorFlow that provides a foundation for Natural Language Understanding (NLU) systems. Our release includes all the code needed to train new SyntaxNet models on your own data, as well as Parsey McParseface, an English parser that we have trained for you and that you can use to analyze English text. Read More

Despite stumbles, news outlets flock to Messenger

The Takeaway – News organizations looking for fresh ways to reach readers see big potential in Facebook’s Messenger “bots.” But early efforts have not done well, and news publishers are still experimenting with the platform to figure out what users want to see. Read More

End of the online advertising bubble

Kalkis Research are not the first to predict the end of the ad bubble, but their compelling report pulls no punches and has caused quite a stir with its dire predictions. They have been responding to some of the comments and the whole bit is useful. Read More

Gilbane Digital Content Conference
Main conference: November 29 – 30
Workshops: December 1, 2016
Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston

Short takes

Big step for Medium. Looks good but are they ready for the slippery slope of formatting support?… How to Make Your Publication Look Great via Medium

Watch out for the The Non-Monetizable Product Blind Spot via The Information

Very welcome feature… Tie your sites together with property sets in Search Console via Google webmaster blog

Good type design is worth the effort… How typography can save your life via Pro Publica

Probably good for EPUB… W3C and International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) explore combining via w3c.org

As it should be… 85 percent of Facebook video is watched without sound via Digiday

HTTP/2 Server push rolling out… Get Ready to See Seconds Shaved Off Web Page Load Times via Technology Review

How many martec vendors does it take to…? Did Morgan Stanley just kill the single-vendor marketing suite? via chiefmartec.com

About

The Gilbane Advisor curates content for our community of content, computing, and digital experience professionals. Subscribe to our newsletter, or our feed.

The Gilbane Digital Content Conference: Content Management, Marketing, and Digital Experience helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and technologies to produce superior digital experiences for customers, employees, and partners.

New Frontiers in Digital Content Distribution

As we said in our most recent Gilbane Advisor, “There are tectonic shifts underway among competing web, mobile, and social platforms, that will have profound effects on digital strategies.” While these shifts will impact everyone who distributes content, the major publishers have the most at stake, are paying the most attention, and are already experimenting. By now these experiments have provided some initial data, in particular with Facebook Instant Articles, though likely not enough to base major decisions on. Since we wrote the session description below a few months ago, Google announced Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) project and Facebook announced Notify. Events are moving quickly.

Whether you are a publisher, brand marketer, or  independent blogger, this panel discussion is bound to be enlightening.

P1. New Frontiers in Digital Content Distribution

Publishers have been using social media as a means to extend their brands, drive traffic to web properties, and cultivate direct relationships with consumers. But the arrival of “off-site” digital media outlets—Facebook’s Instant Articles, Apple News, Snapchat, Twitter Lightning, and whatever Google might dream up next—has publishers asking: will social media platforms usurp publisher’s own brand sites or be a lucrative extension? What are the results from those who are early participants? What are the business and technology issues to consider when deciding whether to take part? How can you prepare your organization, infrastructure and content to be ready if your CEO/CMO decides to take the plunge?

A panel of media technologists will report on their experiences and share their insights as we explore the latest trend in the evolution of digital media.

Wednesday, December, 2: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Moderator: Mark Walter, Director, Strategic Solutions, Managing Editor Inc. (MEI)
Panelists:
Brad Kagawa, VP Technology, Content Management Systems, The New York Times
Jay Brodsky, Principal, Align Digital
Eric Hellweg, Managing Director, Digital Strategy, Harvard Business Review

Speaker Spotlight: Mobile forces simplicity and succinctness

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference. Today we’re spotlighting Pawan Deshpande, Founder & CEO, Curata. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Pawan Deshpande | Gilbane conferencePawan Deshpande

Founder & CEO, Curata

Follow Pawan @TweetsFromPawan

 

Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

Mobile forces simplicity and succinctness, for two reasons, limited screen real estate and limited attention spans, because content is often consumed in a casual setting with other interruptions. It’s forcing us to boil our content, and messages down to the minimum and shed all the excess.

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists.

There is so much discussion about technology for marketing these days because marketing in many ways is the last one to resist technology. Other disciplines have already learned and rely heavily on technology. For example, sales has salesforce, customer support has well-adopted ticketing systems, engineering has source control and bug tracking systems. All of these provide in-depth accountability, management transparency and organization. Marketing is still, however, struggling to adopt CMSs and marketing automation largely because of diverse needs, and the resulting vendor fragmentation. If anything, marketing can learn about technology adoption from other disciplines.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

Content marketing and content strategy are different but often overlap. My diagram below is my perspective on where the responsibilities differ and are shared.

Content strategy and content marketing

Does the ‘internet of things’ have an immediate or near-term impact on your organization’s information or collaboration infrastructure? How so?

Working in B2B setting, it does not have an immediate impact on us. Just like we are setting website personalization have the first impact on B2C, I expect it to trickle down to B2B companies from a content standpoint years from now.

Catch up with Pawan at the Gilbane Conference:

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

C12: Content Marketing Panel
Wednesday, December 3: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Pawan and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Managing and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Content

How does your organization manage and value paid, owned, and earned content? Is there a strategy for each of the three types? A budget?

If you are struggling with measuring the value of marketing related content you are certainly not alone – there is just no easy way to do it. In this session, Gerry Moran from SAP talks about the need for brands to manage and scale the three types of content together to engage customers throughout the sales cycle. Randy Woods from nonlinear creations describes a technique in use for modeling content and mapping it to online behaviors to get a better handle on content marketing costs and return.

Join us Wednesday, December, 3: 11:40 a.m. – 12:40 p.m. at the Gilbane Conference to learn more.

C9. Managing and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Content

Moderator:
Dom Nicastro, Staff Reporter, CMSWire.com

Speakers:
Gerry Moran, Head of Social Media, North America, SAP
Scaling and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Media in Your Organization
Randy Woods, President, nonlinear creations
Of Metrics and Models: Measuring the ROI of Content Marketing

See the complete conference schedule.

Speaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler – Don’t try content marketing without content strategy

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Jeff Cutler, Content Specialist, JeffCutler.com. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Jeff Cutler - Gilbane ConferenceSpeaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler

Content Specialist

JeffCutler.com

Follow Jeff: @jeffcutler

 

 

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

Simply put, if you don’t have a content strategy you should not undertake any content marketing. It’s the strategy component that directs smart decisions about to whom; where; and via what technologies your messaging and content will be shared. If you’re trying to connect with people and don’t have a strategy, it’s like trying to sell your services to an empty room. Figure out your audience. Figure out what tools they use to research the products/services they purchase. Determine if you have the capability and capacity to use these tools effectively. If everything clicks, move forward and start having a conversation and sharing content. Content strategy should be organized in brand and mission meetings – or at least discussed. From there it can be fine-tuned and then revisited before embarking on the content marketing campaign. Once approved, use the content strategy to develop a plan – including content calendar, resources, communication vehicles, sites, technology and more – that will help achieve the goals of that strategy.

Catch up with Jeff at the Gilbane Conference:

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

C12: Content Marketing Panel
Wednesday, December 3: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Jeff and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie – Content marketing and content strategy not the same

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Rahel Anne Bailie, Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant of Intentional Design Inc. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Rahel Bailie image - Gilbane 2014Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie

Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant

Intentional Design Inc.

Follow Rahel: @rahelab

 

Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

The emphasis on having a proper strategy for content delivery is going to increase as we have more complex delivery needs – and I believe that smartphones are just the tip of the iceberg. Wearables will be the next challenge, and who knows what will come after that. So some of what we need to do is think “content first” and combine that with responsive design and adaptive content. That means changes to technology and infrastructure, changes to processes, and improvements to skill sets of both technologists and writers.

Does the ‘internet of things’ have an immediate or near-term impact on your organization’s information or collaboration infrastructure? How so?

The idea that the internet of things is going to be a walk-in-the-park is a little optimistic. There are lots of business drivers and user behaviors that need to be figured out before there will be adoption at any scale. If any information or collaboration infrastructure is affected, it needs to be between market analysts and technologists, who are usually at opposite ends of a project.

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists?

Any department along the content delivery supply chain needs to develop basic literacy when it comes to marketing technologies. Each organization has its idiosyncrasies, but that doesn’t mean a particular department gets to take a pass. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and we’ve seen time and time again how weak links can sink an entire initiative, by being blockers.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

This is a particular irritation of mine. Content marketing and content strategy are two distinct disciplines. There are overlaps, sure, but the very names indicate the distinction. Content marketing is about just that, marketing, with a focus on acquiring and engaging target audiences, which in turns drives an increase in the bottom line. Content strategy keeps marketing in mind – after all, you don’t want to do anything to harm profitability – but the focus is on planning for the management of content throughout the entire content lifecycle, no matter what the input or output. Content strategy is the umbrella to any content marketing strategy because it does not confine itself to a single content silo or type; content strategy instead provides the glue that connects all sub-strategies together, including content marketing.

Catch up with Rahel at the Gilbane Conference:

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience

T5: Multichannel Content Management – How do you do it?
Wednesday, December 3: 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Rahel and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Additional Gilbane Conference workshops posted

Gilbane conference lightbulb logo

We’ll be posting the complete program for this years’ Gilbane Conference over the next 2-3 weeks on the main conference website. The afternoon workshops are below.

Workshop D. Adaptive Content Modeling for Omnichannel UX

Speaker: Noz Urbina, Consultant and Founder, Urbina Consulting

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Your users need you to come to this session, even if they don’t know it. Multi-channel, or “COPE (create once, publish everywhere)”, content is a bit of a holy grail. Our trade is discussing content being freed from the browser, available for reuse, and accessible in apps, kiosks, responsive mobile deliverables, eBooks and syndication services to our partners – even in wearable technologies. All this should improve the experience of users, and benefit the organizations that serve them. Adaptive content is content that is nimble enough to realize all these ambitions. But making our content adaptive means addressing a topic that sends many running for the fire exit or nearest window: semantic modeling of structured content. This session will connect the dots between adaptive content, responsive design, multi-channel delivery and user experiences to show you why you want and even need to have semantic content structures. It will then go through a non-terrifying introduction to getting started with modeling your own content in a future-proof way. Learning objectives:

  1. The knowledge that their content is already more structured than they realize.
  2. A solid sense of what semantic, structured content actually is and its relationship to adaptive content, multichannel, and UX.

This workshop is designed for either intermediate or expert attendees. Bring your laptop and go home with samples and templates.

Workshop E. CMS Implementations: The View from the Implementor’s Side

Speaker: Deane Barker, Director of Business Development, Blend Interactive

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Ever wanted to know how CMS integration shops approach projects, and how you can better work with them or use their techniques in your own organization? In this workshop, Deane Barker will explain the ins and outs of CMS project work from the perspective of a veteran integrator, with the goal of helping you understand how best to find an integrator, work with your chosen integrator, or manage your project and team. Learn about how integrators:

  • Evaluate RFPs
  • Develop proposals
  • Scope projects
  • Schedule work
  • Manage client expectations
  • Plan implementations
  • Select software
  • Execute and manage development
  • Support existing implementations

Workshop F. What’s it Worth? Assessing the ROI of your Content

Speaker: Lindy Roux, VP, Content Marketing and Strategy, Rauxa

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

No matter how well researched and deliberate your content strategy is, the proof lies in the pudding and the most successful content professionals continually evaluate the effectiveness of their content and adapt their strategies to improve the return. Too often, content is evaluated or audited only when a major digital shift is in play (a move to a new CMS, a new marketing automation tool, a new campaign launch.) In order to be truly successful, that evaluation should be ongoing, providing the opportunity to learn from past content marketing successes and failures. Lindy Roux will demonstrate an approach to content evaluation across multiple channels, based on qualitative and quantitative assessments, which has been used to help organizations understand the true ROI of a piece of content. The session will end with a practical exercise in content evaluation where participants will try their hand at developing assessment criteria and then applying these to real content. Participants in the session will learn:

  • How to establish content goals that are measurable and realistic
  • A way to evaluate content against these goals
  • How to establish a regular review workflow and process
  • An approach to optimization across all channels
  • The appropriate team structure for ongoing content performance