Category: Globalization, localization (page 3 of 18)

Alfresco and VDEL GmbH Partner

Alfresco Software and VDEL GmbH, an IT services distribution company, announced a partnership under which VDEL has become a Master Distributor of Alfresco solutions in the territories of Eastern Europe, Russia, and CIS. Under the terms of the agreement, VDEL will offer Alfresco products, associated support, and training to its customers. The open source model allows Alfresco to use open source technologies and contributions from the open source community. In 2009, Alfresco obtained U.S. Department of Defence 5015.02 records management certification. VDEL is known in Eastern Europe, Russia, and CIS for; marketing, distributing and supporting network and security solutions. Because of their network of local partners VDEL is able to provide native language translation, localization and education. http://www.alfresco.com/  http://www.vdel.com/

Survey on MT Adoption and Usage within Global Content Value Chains

Last year as we pursued our research for the Multilingual Product Content study we saw an opportunity for further study of the role of machine translation (MT) as an element in the global content value chain (GCVC).  To this end, Gilbane Group is now conducting an online survey on MT adoption and buyer / user expectations.  The survey covers domains using MT, target applications, integration, benefits and business drivers, as well as obstacles to adoption.

Adoption of MT in some form or another is gaining acceptance and use (we anticipate) will soon be prevalent, especially as a strategy for managing user-generated content in multiple languages.  We are seeking input from IT, content, and language professionals within global enterprises as well as service providers.  Current adoption of MT is not a requirement for taking the survey.

The survey is online and will take less than 10 minutes to complete.  In exchange for participation, respondents will receive aggregated survey results and the executive summary of the analysis. Take the survey nowContact us if you have any questions about the research.

FlashMoto Introduces Multilingual Flash CMS

FlashMoto.com, a start up that specializes in Flash website creation and provides a Flash CMS, launched an updated version of their Flash content management system with multiple language support. FlashMoto’s control panel has been translated into 12 languages, among which are: Spanish, Bulgarian, Japanese, Romanian, Italian, Russian, Chinese, Hungarian, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Serbian, and Czech. The interface language can be changed once a user logs into the admin panel. Users may edit their Flash CMS website content, add new pages, edit and delete the existing pages, manage the website menu, galleries, contact forms, upload videos and music, etc. Other features include SEO support, ability to upload your own fonts and integrate external modules and widgets. All the data is stored in XML files instead of a database. FlashMoto flash content management system features a basic navigation interface and WYSIWYG editor. In its next version, expected to be launched towards the end of March, FlashMoto will add 4 more languages: German, French, Turkish and Polish.  http://www.flashmoto.com/

Content Globalization: Hot Topics at Gilbane San Francisco

We’re featuring multlingual content strategies, practices, and technologies in four sessions on the San Franciso program:

  • Reaching Global Audiences: Case Studies in Multilingual Multisite Web Content Management
  • Breaking Out of the Silo: Improving Global Content Value Chains by Collaborating Across Departments
  • Content Metrics: Tools for Measuring ROI in Global Content Infrastructures
  • Eliminating the Multilingual Multiplier: Addressing the Cost of Producing Formatted Content in Multiple Languages

These topics are among the hot spots on Gilbane’s 2010 Content Globalization Heat Map, which identifies a set of key investments that companies can make today to advance their content globalization practices and overcome language afterthought syndrome. (See this presentation for more information on these concepts.)

We’re in the process of populating the sessions with top-notch speakers. Check the Gilbane San Francisco conference site for updates. Twitter is #gilbanesf.

Content Globalization: Hot Topics at Gilbane San Francisco

We’re featuring multlingual content strategies, practices, and technologies in four sessions on the San Franciso program:

  • Reaching Global Audiences: Case Studies in Multilingual Multisite Web Content Management
  • Breaking Out of the Silo: Improving Global Content Value Chains by Collaborating Across Departments
  • Content Metrics: Tools for Measuring ROI in Global Content Infrastructures
  • Eliminating the Multilingual Multiplier: Addressing the Cost of Producing Formatted Content in Multiple Languages

These topics are among the hot spots on Gilbane’s 2010 Content Globalization Heat Map, which identifies a set of key investments that companies can make today to advance their content globalization practices and overcome language afterthought syndrome. (See this presentation for more information on these concepts.)

We’re in the process of populating the sessions with top-notch speakers. Check the Gilbane San Francisco conference site for updates. Twitter is #gilbanesf.

How will the Apple iPad cause headaches for creators of multilingual content?

Apple recently unveiled its new iPad device with a flourish of global PR. iPads will go on sale in the U.S. around the end of March this year, and in other countries in the following months. Press and analysts have had a field day praising and condemning the iPad’s capabilities and features, predicting (depending on who you listen to) that the device will be either a terrible flop or another runaway success for Apple.

My analysis predicts that Apple will sell millions of units of its new “universal media device,” as analyst Ned May of Outsell Inc. describes it, but Apple’s success is not my subject today. Instead, it’s a warning: People who generate content for global markets need to know how the iPad might make their work more difficult.

The problem is caused by a technical gap the new iPad shares with its older siblings, the iPhone and the iPod touch. None of them can use Adobe Flash. (For more on Apple’s deliberate omission of Flash and its consequences, see this New York Times story and this one.)

Thousands of global businesses use Flash movies with captions or voiceover narration as quick, relatively low-cost ways to present marketing videos and user guides over the Web to multilingual audiences. For these businesses and the agencies that work with them, the Flash gap is a growing problem. Instead of Flash movies, millions of iPhone and iPod Touch users see blank white spaces. The iPad boasts a larger screen, with display capabilities that will be attractive for business tasks. But all those millions of Flash animations and interviews and guides and other videos will be invisible. Just blank white spaces, no matter what language you speak. That is the Flash gap, which the iPad will make worse.

The alternative is to deliver videos using HTML5. But not all web browsers work with HTML5. Neither do all devices, especially mobile devices. This means Web video providers need to research what specific devices their target audiences use, and what video technology those devices will support.

So if you provide multilingual video content, you have one more detail to pay attention to when you plan your schedules and budget.

Glyph Launches Free Mobile App Localization Program

Glyph Language Services has launched a limited time offer to localize mobile applications and games for free. New clients can receive localization and emulator testing services for one Android or iPhone app in one target language. The offer includes localization of up to 1000 words of content from the UI, source code and distribution portal, as well as emulator testing of the localized app. Available target languages include English, Spanish (Spain or Latin America), French, Italian, German, Portuguese (Brazil), Russian, Polish, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Korean or Japanese. www.glyphservices.com/

SDL acquires eCommerce Software Company Fredhopper

SDL plc announces the acquisition of Fredhopper, experts in targeting and marketing software for eCommerce. This acquisition is part of SDL’s strategy and commitment to delivering solutions for enterprises with complex, multi-lingual sales and marketing and customer support requirements. SDL has seen a growing demand for solutions that manage and optimise high value customer engagements to drive online revenue and improve customer satisfaction across multiple channels. The deal will allow Fredhopper, which counts Clarks, Toys R Us, B&Q, Waitrose and Otto Group – the world’s second biggest eCommerce company behind Amazon.com – among its stable of over 100 large international retail customers, to embark on a global rollout of its product suite and expand operations into the US and Asia. The company currently operates in four European countries – the UK, Germany, France and the Netherlands. Fredhopper will become an independent division of SDL that will be named ‘SDL eCommerce Technologies.’ The division will be led by Fredhopper’s current management team, and be focused on providing targeting and marketing software for online retailers. Fredhopper brings technology for effective targeting and personalisation, intelligent search, merchandising and measurement. In addition, Fredhopper brings R&D and Professional Services teams into the larger SDL group. The acquisition will also enable Fredhopper to launch its online targeting technology into new verticals – namely financial services, insurance, and manufacturing, through SDL’s existing Web Content Management solutions. http://www.fredhopper.com/, http://www.sdltridion.com

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