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Category: Authoring & Design (page 1 of 15)

How do you “do” personalized experiences?

Gilbane’s Digital Experience Conference

Washington DC April 28 – 29, Workshops May 1

facing crowd

Personalization is hard, and not getting it right isn’t an option — we’ve all experienced what that can look like. Colin Eagan provides a road map — what an “experience designer” needs to do throughout the process from technology selection through to iterative improvement. 

B104. Designing Personalized Experiences 

It’s now estimated that some 45% of organizations have attempted to personalize their own homepage in some way — but fewer than a third think it’s actually “working.” If that scares you, you’re not alone: As personalization technology races from niche to mainstream, the design community is racing to catch up. It’s time for a UX intervention. This highly practical talk focuses on the role of experience designer in influencing user-centered personalization design, including technology selection, user data models, and, of course, wireframes. Specifically, it covers what the well-versed designer should know about the latest personalization technology; what to do when you get a request to “do personalization” (either at your organization or your clients’); how to fit personalized user content into a larger information design system; how to use your role in UX to influence technical product selection; grow to translate actual user needs into a real-time user data model (“living personas”); wireframe-level guidelines for introducing personalized components in web and email; and creating a measurement framework based on “quick-wins” and iterative improvement.

Monday, April 29: 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.


Colin Eagan

Colin Eagan
Principal, User Experience Design, ICF NEXT

 

 

Learn more & register with code FG19 for best available price

 

Diamond sponsors

Google Cloud
Gridspace
twilio
ZOHO

Platinum sponsors

SAP digital experience
Shufflr
 

 

Gilbane Conferences have been providing content, computing, and digital experience professionals with trusted content since 2002.

Learn about the future of block-based editing and CMSs

Gilbane’s Digital Experience Conference

Washington DC April 28 – 29, Workshops May 1

digital experience networking

The new “Gutenberg” editor for WordPress is ambitious and controversial. Gutenberg adds layout tools in the form of blocks, which has many advantages, but can also be seem a burden. A classic problem for authoring tools is the inherent tension between layout designers and authors for control and flexibility in content creation. In general, there is no perfect balance, but Gutenberg is something to check out, and at least keep an eye on.

Speaker Andrew Roberts is uniquely qualified to explain the relationship between the WordPress classic editor and Gutenberg. Both depend on code from the TinyMCE text editor, and Tiny has worked with Automattic on Gutenberg. Join him on Monday, April 29: 3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

A105. Is block-based editing the future of web content management systems?

“Gutenberg” is the controversial new block-based editing experience introduced in WordPress 5.0. Find out what this means for the future of editing in the world’s most popular content management system, as well as how this may impact other CMSs.

 

Andrew Roberts,
CEO, Tiny

 
 

 

Learn more & use code FG19 for best available price

Diamond sponsors

Google Cloud
Gridspace
twilio
ZOHO

Platinum sponsors

SAP digital experience
Shufflr
RingCentral logo

 

Gilbane Conferences have been providing content, computing, and digital experience professionals with trusted content since 2002.

The convergence of web and mobile design

The actual title of the article I am referring to above is 7 future web design trends, by Jowita Ziobro. The trends are on target and the examples are clear. Worth a read.

But what struck me is that the post is a reminder that the way to look at planning and development of web and mobile applications is to focus on the ‘and’. Too much of the discussion is about the limitations of web or mobile or which should come first – a sometimes necessary short term choice but not a strategy. Jowita’s larger point is that from a design point of view web and mobile are converging. The post also suggests functional convergence.

Design convergence

Jowita’s first trend, “Gestures are the new clicks”, provides one example:

We forget how hard scrolling webpages used to be. Most users would painstakingly move their mouse to the right edge of the screen, to use something ancient called a ‘scrollbar’…

In 2015 it’s far easier to scroll than it is to click. On mobile, you can scroll wildly with your thumb. To click on a precise target is actually more difficult — the complete opposite of what we’re used to on the desktop.

As a result, we should expect more and more websites to be built around scrolling first, and clicking second. And of course, that’s exactly what we’ve seen everywhere…

There’s every reason to expect this trend to continue as mobile takes over more of the market. Modern sites have fewer things to click, and much more scrolling. We’ll see fewer links, more buttons, bigger ‘clickable’ areas, and taller pages that expect to be scrolled.

So mobile is changing web design for the better, and not only because of the consistency of the UX but because it is offers improvements.

Functional convergence

Mobile is also learning from the web. Mobile apps are either constrained by limited access to their own data and content, need custom deep linking to code to access other apps data, or need to exit to the web via a web browser. Whether the app uses a lightweight custom browser built for the app or one of the mainstream browsers the UX often suffers. The limited linking of mobile apps is a significant functional constraint, especially for enterprise apps.

Apple and Google are each interested in the health of both the web and their own mobile ecosystems and are both advancing deep linking to address data and content access. This will be a little wild-westy for awhile but the direction is clear.

Jowita’s sixth trend, “Components are the new frameworks” is relevant to design and function:

Web technology continues to get more complicated, and less semantic. Designers must embed messy code onto their pages for simple tasks, like including Google Analytics or a Facebook Like button. It would be a lot easier if we could just write something like this instead:

<google-analytics key=”UA-12345–678″>

And we can with Web Components, which aren’t quite ready to be used by most designers yet. 2015 is looking like their year.

Google’s Material design is here, and it may just be what gets this movement started. Powered by Polymer, and supported by all modern browsers, it provides the rich animation and interaction components from Android apps, with simple tags…

Apple’s newly announced Safari View Controller for iOS 9 ups the ante for mobile browsers by providing developers access to Safari code making it much easier to access the web from mobile apps. Developers can still build their own for specific design or functional reasons if they need to. See iOS 9 and Safari View Controller: The Future of Web Views.

Jowita ends with:

Right now you see the best of mobile app design appearing in web design. With enough time, the difference between an app and a website might almost entirely disappear.

Optimistic perhaps, but there is a trend to root for here. And a perspective to be embraced for a superior UX.

Modern Design Tools: Adaptive Layouts

I’m sure there are exceptions, but design has almost always followed function in software development. That was never a great situation, but today’s reality of the constant additions of new form factors forces us to figure out how build function and design in a more parallel and earlier iterative environment.

Responsive design is an important approach to dress up the past and get started with workable multichannel publishing, but its scale is limited.

See Josh Puckett’s discussion in Modern Design Tools: Adaptive Layouts for some great ideas and links to other discussions.

Since our tools shape our thinking, it’s critical that we have design tools that allow us to go beyond the static thinking that has encumbered us for so long. While it’s technically possible to design and optimize for various layouts and orientations today, it’s tedious and difficult, which means that we often don’t do it.

Design tools should have the same properties as the medium for which we are designing… Let’s take a look at how a modern design tool might work for designing an iPhone app. Read more

Adobe Announces Website Creation Tool for Graphic Designers

Adobe has unveiled the public beta of new software, code-named “Muse”, that enables graphic and web designers to design and publish HTML websites without writing code or working within restrictive templates. Leveraging the latest Web standards, Muse combines design and creative freedom with frameworks for adding navigation, widgets and HTML for advanced interactivity on a website. Designers can add fully customizable interactive elements like slideshows, lightboxes, remote rollovers and more. Muse embeds HTML code snippets from sources including Google Maps, YouTube and Facebook and allows for the creation of Adobe‚Äêhosted trial sites for testing and review purposes. A site can be sent to clients, converted to a paid Adobe‚Äêhosted site or exported for FTP to other hosting providers. Muse is different from other Adobe web design products such as Dreamweaver, which requires coding to build websites; Edge, which is for creating HTML5 animations and motion-based graphics (not websites) or Flash Catalyst, a tool for designing internet applications built on Flex. http://muse.adobe.com

Box Announces Google Docs Integration

Box.net announced new integration with Google Docs. Box users can now create, edit and concurrently edit with Google Docs. In the announcing blog post, doubt was expressed by Box.net over Microsoft opening Office 365 to 3rd party developers like themselves, and thus implies that this integration with Google will be the focus of the Box.net platform for the foreseeable future. http://www.box.net/

Google Now Supports “Author” Tag

Google announced support for authorship markup—a way to connect authors with their content on the web. They are experimenting with using this data to help people find content from great authors in our search results. They now support markup that enables websites to publicly link within their site from content to author pages. For example, if an author at The New York Times has written dozens of articles, using this markup, the webmaster can connect these articles with a New York Times author page. An author page describes and identifies the author, and can include things like the author’s bio, photo, articles and other links. The markup uses existing standards such as HTML5 and XFN to enable search engines and other web services to identify works by the same author across the web. If you’re already doing structured data markup using microdata from schema.org, they will interpret that authorship information as well. http://www.google.com

SpringCM Launches New Version with Eye on Mobility, Collaboration

SpringCM announced the latest release of its cloud enterprise content management platform. This latest release features new case management capabilities, helps SpringCM customers deliver more consistent execution, enhance team productivity and increase management visibility of key business processes. In addition, mobile support for iPad uses intuitive-gesture interface, but also gives access to cloud capabilities such as full-text search of corporate-content repositories. Other highlights include: Enhances quality-of-service and compliance with defined rules; Provides a status view to all case participants to improve team and customer communication; Faster responsiveness to objectives and process changes; Enables more effective internal collaboration on cases; Improves communication with customers and other service requesters; and it requires minimal IT resources. http://www.springcm.com/

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