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Press Release: Gilbane Conference Keynotes Share Strategies for Building Next-Generation Digital Experiences

Gilbane Conference 2013, Banner, Content and the Digital Experience

The rapid-fire format allows attendees to get the most from their keynote experience

Boston — October 10, 2013BUSINESS WIRE – The Gilbane Conference 2013 (http://gilbaneconference.com), now in its 12th year, taking place December 3–5 at the Westin Boston Waterfront, features a stellar mix of leading industry practitioners and analysts in its two keynote sessions.

In the first keynote session, hear from two marketing executives at global organizations who have critical responsibilities for digital experience strategy and delivery. Our third speaker, a technologist who co-founded a company to help brands and agencies implement digital experiences, authors the well-known and highly Chief Marketing Technologist blog covering the intersection of marketing and technology.

The keynotes, scheduled on Tuesday, December 3 at 8:30 a.m., and 11:00, a.m., are moderated by conference founder and chair, Frank Gilbane. The first features the following speakers and topics:

  • Sara Larsen, Vice President, Digital Marketing, SAP
    Squeeze Every Penny Out of Your Content Investment
  • Meghan Walsh, Senior Director, eCommerce Platform System Management, Marriott International
    Rethinking Content Delivery: Moving Beyond a Traditional Web Content Management Approach
  • Scott Brinker, Founder & CTO, ion interactive, inc., and Author, Chief Marketing Technologist Blog
    What Is a Marketing Technologist?

“One of the unique benefits of our conferences is that we always include industry analysts from multiple competing firms to ensure our conference attendees hear differing opinions so they can make better informed decisions” says Gilbane Conference founder and chair, Frank Gilbane. “In our second keynote session, we have senior analysts from Gartner, Forrester, and Real Story Group. Each will address a topic crucial to digital experience strategies for customers and employees.”

Speakers and topics include:

  • Jake Sorofman, Research Director, Marketing Leaders Research Team, Gartner
    Move Over Big Data — Here Comes Big Content!
  • Stephen Powers, Vice President and Research Director, Forrester Research
    The Context Conundrum?
  • Tony Byrne, Founder, Real Story Group
    ShakesPoint: What the Bard Could Teach Us About SharePoint — And the Digital World

To register to attend the Gilbane Conference 2013 go to https://secure.infotoday.com/forms/default.aspx?form=gil2013 or phone 1-800-300-9868. For a limited time, those who sign up for the ConferencePlus Pass will receive a Google Nexus 7.

Media registration is open to working journalists and analysts with commercial news organizations and research firms. To register for free, please go to .

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About Bluebill Advisors and Gilbane.com
Gilbane.com was launched in 1996 by Frank Gilbane. Bluebill Advisors, Inc. is a technology analyst firm focused on disruptive information technologies and their potential for strategic application. The firm has advised hundreds of organizations representing a wide range of industries and has helped executives responsible for a variety of functions, including corporate strategy, marketing, investment, product development and support, engineering, and publishing. Bluebill has created the program and chaired the Gilbane Conferences since its inception in 2002.

About Information Today, Inc.
Information Today, Inc., (www.infotoday.com) is a leading publisher and conference organizer in the field of technology and technology applications in today’s enterprise. In addition to producing the KMWorld, CRM Evolution, and Customer Service Experience conferences, Information Today, Inc. publishes KMWorld, EContent, and CRM magazines and their corresponding websites (www.destinationCRM.com, www.econtentmag.com, and www.kmworld.com). The company also publishes Streaming Media and Speech Technology magazines and organizes several other technology conferences including the Gilbane Conference.

Contact:

Information Today
Misty Simms, 859-278-2223
msimms@infotoday.com

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The Gilbane Conference is growing!

Gilbane Conference 2013, Banner, Content and the Digital Experience

 

 

 

 

Some of you may have heard there is some exciting news with regard to The Gilbane Conference.

We have entered into a partnership with Information Today, Inc. to organize and manage future conferences in this 12-year-old series. As you may know, Information Today is the publisher of KMWorld and EContent magazines along with a host of other publications and websites. Information Today also organizes the KMWorld and Enterprise Search Summit conferences, so they are on familiar ground with respect to web content management, content marketing, social media, and many other related technologies.

Information Today also publishes CRM magazine and produces the CRM Evolution conference and exhibition, which will enable us to reach out to marketers and other customer-focused professionals.

We believe the synergies between The Gilbane Conference and Information Today will assist us in producing even better and more innovative conferences in the years to come.

The resources of a larger enterprise and the personal care and attention you’ve come to know at The Gilbane Conference are what you can expect this fall.

The next Gilbane Conference will be at the Westin Boston Waterfront, December 3 – 5, 2013. We will be announcing the Boston venue and dates in the next week or two and See the new Gilbane Conference website for more information where we will be posting additional details very soon. If you are not already on our mailing list for advance information you can signup using the quick form below.

Our theme this year is Content and the Digital Experience: Manage, Measure, Mobilize, Monetize, and we’ll be continuing our vendor and analyst neutral coverage of content, marketing, and digital experience technologies for enhancing both customer and employee engagement and collaboration.

We look forward to seeing you in Boston this fall.

Sign up for conference updatesWe would love to hear more about your interests. You can tell us more by using our more complete form. Or send us a message.

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Top 20 List: World’s Largest Publishers

The list of the 20 largest publishers in the world shows a profoundly changing landscape in book publishing. The chart below is provided by Rüdiger Wischenbart from Publishing Perspectives in Germany. He has contributed some good insights into the transformation of the publishing industry. I offer my analysis on the state of the industry and its future.

 

Some publishers are fairing much better economically, while others are steadily sliding downward in revenue and in their global standing. The changing dynamics between the professional information, education and trade sectors has affected this year’s ranking.  The good news is that publishers that have reinvented themselves (responded to market demand by listening to the customer) have done much better than most.

Pearson, Thomson Reuters, Cengage are identified as star performers on the list. Four out of five dollars is generated through the digital integrated value chain. The digital content and e-book industry for professional information content is the high growth segment of the publishing industry. As an industry, we are weak in our recognition of the current size and opportunity of the digital marketplace. Education publishers and trade publishers are having trouble evolving. There is broad need for knowledgeable skilled digital workers, experienced strategic thinkers, scalable and flexible technology infrastructure, and streamlined workflow/processes that allow publishers to execute on updated strategic initiatives.

Asian publishers are becoming a force, as they are in many other market segments. They include companies like Korea’s Kyowon and China’s Higher Education Press. Their strong suit is “localizing” content (i.e. cultural adaptation), and the power and economics of a huge growing audience. They are hungry. They want their piece of the pie.

Trade publishers, experiencing a steady decline in revenues, are poorly positioned to compete. However, the strong performance of Penguin and Hachette are current exceptions in this segment. It remains to be seen if trade publishers can transform into a sustainable business model. Trade’s poor performance and outlook is due to several reasons, beginning with the fact that they have the farthest to go to find and serve today’s and tomorrow’s readers.

We have seen endless debate in trade on digital pricing and searches for new business models. The best solutions will leverage and be respectful of the stakeholders…all of them! That includes, but is not limited to; authors, agents publishers, libraries, distributors, wholesalers, physical bookstores, digital bookstores, printers, service providers, the media, reviewers, technology companies, etc. If publishers burry their heads in the sand by refusing to experiment with new content, pricing models, and sales channels, then there will be serious trouble.

On the bright side, if publishers aggressively discuss new ways to sell content with their channel partners, and seek out non-traditional channel partners that have the audiences with the demand for their products, there is the potential, not to just maintain current revenue, but to actually grow the size of the pie. I know that is a radical statement to make, yet the ‘book’ is being redefined, and publishing is becoming something new.

Several key findings:

  • The majority of Top Ranked Global Publishers are based in Europe.
  • Professional/knowledge, STM publishers have course corrected and are doing well.
  • The first major Asian Publishers are positioning towards competing as top global players.
  • Education sector is unstable.
  • Trade Publishers are, and will be, hit the hardest in the rapidly emerging digital marketplace.
  • Publishers that have reinvented themselves…are prospering!

I have high hopes for the publishing industry. However, until we can meet Peter Drucker’s market-centric definition where he says “…the aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself.” Are we there yet? When we achieve this value statement the industry will once again be healthy. As for me…being part of the solution? I am passionate about helping our clients build a stronger publishing industry that is focused on improving the reading experience.

What are you thinking now?

*The “Global Ranking of the Publishing Industry” is an annual initiative of Livres Hebdo, Paris, researched by Ruediger Wischenbart Content and Consulting, and co-published with buchreport (Germany), The Bookseller (UK) and Publishers Weekly (US).

Follow Ted Treanor on Twitter: twitter.com/ePubDr

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Content Technology Works! — DAM’s Role in Brand Management

Simple truth: there’s no better way to judge the effectiveness of content technologies than by listening to the people that implement them.
When I transitioned from the corporate to the analyst world, I was determined not to fall into the “continental divide” that often disconnects pundits from practitioners. I’ve found that authoring case studies is one of the best ways to avoid the abyss. The process is rewarding in many ways, but the most profound is the ability to connect the dots between the potential impact of content technologies and real-world results.
Another simple truth? Content technology works. CTW’s newest case study on Whirlpool Corporation’s implementation of digital asset management is proof positive. The story describes the journey from departmental DAM to an enterprise brand management infrastructure as told by Whirlpool’s Creative Works organization. Their successes are admirable; their experiences are best practices material; their candor provides vital advice for content technology adopters.
Although I am certainly biased, this case study is well worth the read. Check it Out!

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Everyone’s A Publisher

The impact of the Internet on most things personal and professional could be the life’s work of many a sociologist. How we shop, play games, read newspapers and books, and even how we fall in love doesn’t escape redefinition and change. From my perspective, its how we communicate that’s one of the more interesting topics. Safe to say that 10, perhaps even 5 years ago, stating that “everyone’s a publisher” would be quizzical. Now, evidence abounds.
In terms of “social” publishing, blogs and wikis certainly top the list of examples. These days however, those who chat, shop or place a classified ad in a newspaper can also be called a social publisher. And that’s a lot of people.
Granted, the usability of online forms for these types of tasks is usually exceptional enough to hide this fact. But the underlying result immediately publishes opinions, product reviews, and ads to the broadest communication vehicle available today. Even better, the tools are intuitive, fast, cheap, in some cases, free.
In terms of “corporate” publishing, the once contained group of professionals who publish to the Internet is no more. Formalized content technologies allow personnel across most, if not all business units to redefine information creation and delivery — toward the goal of eradicating Web publishing bottlenecks.
The tools in this arena, a.k.a content management systems and according to IDC, “dynamic enterprise publishing products”, certainly don’t boast the same reputation as those for social publishing. In fact, evaluation criteria such as usability, speed and cost often contradicts the notion of “intuitive, fast, and cheap.”
Still, the content technologies software market continues to redefine corporate publishing and support the fact that indeed, “everyone’s a publisher.” And every so often, there’s a real grassroots example of the ever-expanding definition of corporate publishers who create and deliver Web content on a daily basis. From my perspective, Macromedia provides the most recent example.

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