Archive for Standards

HTML5 Definition Complete, W3C Moves to Interoperability Testing and Performance

HTML5_Logo_128The W3C announced today that the HTML5 definition is complete, and on schedule to be finalized in 2014. This is excellent news for the future of the open Web, that is, all of us. If you were involved in discussions about mobile development strategies at our recent conference you’ll want to check out all the details at http://dev.w3.org/html5/decision-policy/html5-2014-plan.

Moving right along, the HTML Working Group also published the first draft of HTML 5.1 so you can see a little further down the road for planning purposes. See http://www.w3.org/TR/2012/WD-html51-20121217/.

From the W3C newsletter…

W3C published today the complete definition of the “HTML5″ and “Canvas 2D” specifications. Though not yet W3C standards, these specifications are now feature complete, meaning businesses and developers have a stable target for implementation and planning. “As of today, businesses know what they can rely on for HTML5 in the coming years, and what their customers will demand,” said Jeff Jaffe, W3C CEO. HTML5 is the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform, a full programming environment for cross-platform applications with access to device capabilities; video and animations; graphics; style, typography, and other tools for digital publishing; extensive network capabilities; and more.

To reduce browser fragmentation and extend implementations to the full range of tools that consume and produce HTML, W3C now embarks on the stage of W3C standardization devoted to interoperability and testing. W3C is on schedule to finalize the HTML5 standard in 2014. In parallel, the W3C community will continue its work on next generation HTML features, including extensions to complement built-in HTML5 accessibility, responsive images, and adaptive streaming.

W3C Web Platform Docs – a new resource for web developers

Web Platform.orgW3C announced Web Platform Docs, which promises to be a valuable new resource for web developers of all levels. Imagine a single site that you can depend on for up-to-date, accurate, and browser and device neutral answers and advice for both simple and complex questions. It is brand new and “alpha” but already useful. Below is info from their announcement and a short video. For those of us that prefer textual info see this blog post from Doug Schepers: http://blog.webplatform.org/2012/10/one-small-step/

W3C, in collaboration with Adobe, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Mozilla, Nokia, Opera, and others, announced today the alpha release of Web Platform Docs (docs.webplatform.org). This is a new community-driven site that aims to become a comprehensive and authoritative source for web developer documentation. With Web Platform Docs, web professionals will save time and resources by consulting with confidence a single site for current, cross-browser and cross-device coding best practices.

Understanding Globalization Standards: Gilbane Boston Session Summary

The Globalization Track’s “Understanding the Globalization Standards Landscape” session provided a trio of experts to content management professionals wading through the industry’s “alphabet soup” of authoring, translation, and integration standards. Moderator Kaija Poysti deftly led the audience on a road trip through a multi-dimensional standards landscape with more than a few controversial roadblocks.
The mission was to understand how a standards-driven strategy provides an impact on customer experience, provide expert guidance on which ones really matter, and take-away advice on what to ask when evaluating solutions. Panelists Don DePalma from Common Sense Advisory (CSA), Andrew Draheim from Dig-IT!, and Serge Gladkoff from GALA delivered on the mission and then some, with commentary on which are practical, which are simply theoretical, and most importantly, which have a positive impact when adopted. Highlights:

    • On a “standards reality check”: “You have no choice on some; Some are about good hygiene, but little used; and others are not ready for prime time in their current form. However, the code and content ecosystems definitely need an injection of globalization DNA.” Don DePalma, CSA.
    • On standards benefits: “Adoption can decrease the internal cost of doing business, decrease typical business risks, facilitate business interactions, increase the value of services to clients, save on R&D and business development, and save on internal personnel training. However, there are too many private standards and too few generally-adopted public standards. Standards are notoriously difficult to develop and upon completion, they compete; be warned though, the “winning” standards not always the best ones.” Serge Gladkoff, GALA Standards Committee Chair.
    • On synergies between content and translation management: “When these technologies work together, it streamlines processes, reduces duplication and errors, and makes publishing easier. Which standards will be around tomorrow? Take a look at Translation Memory eXchange, Segmentation Rules eXchange, XML Localisation Interchange File Format (XLIFF), and TermBase eXchange.” Andrew Draheim, Dig-IT!.

Many thanks to our panel for guiding our audience through the globalization standards landscape with candor and real-world advice.

Medical Devices: Mandate for Safety in Any Language

Crimson Life Sciences, a division of TransPerfect, Inc., recently announced that it has been certified by Underwriters Laboratories as compliant with ISO 14971, the “only international standard for risk management for medical devices.” According to UL, “ISO 14971 has become an integral element for satisfying regulatory requirements in most major markets.” Crimson’s certification relates to risk management processes for translating medical device labeling and documentation.
The announcement caught our attention because medical device manufacturing is one of the verticals on the Gilbane globalization practice radar. It’s a huge market in which significant opportunity is spread across the globe. Just one proof point: according to RIC International, “25% of medical devices produced in the US are exported, with diagnostics comprising the largest export sector.” As such, this vertical is generating a significant amount of the demand for solutions that integrate content management and translation process management in a global content life cycle. Which is why it’s of particular interest to us in Gilbane’s globalization practice.
Medical device manufacturers face some of the most rigorous challenges associated with content translation. They must create, translate and publish product support content that describes medical devices, documents proper procedures, complies with global regulations, and enables best practices. The risks associated with poorly translated content are particularly onerous for these companies. Crimson Life Sciences recognized this and went the extra mile have its risk management methodologies for translation validated by an international certification authority.
An important sub-theme here is quality of translated content and translation processes. Today, quality measurement is a mix of science and art (science in the case of industries with established standards such as SAE J2450 in automotive). Crimson’s UL certification is another step towards taking some the mystery out of quality verification.
The issues of multi-lingual content, translation processes, quality, and brand management come together in a case study on GE Healthcare that Gilbane will publish this fall. We’re also working on a white paper that identifies opportunities to insert quality improvements into the global content life cycle. For insight into content-related business issues in medical device manufacturing in the meantime, see our case study on Siemens Medical, and check out the archived webinar we did earlier this summer with Medtronic. We’ll also be covering quality and the global customer experience as the theme of the globalization sessions and keynote at Gilbane Boston 2007.

Gilbane Launches Conference on Content Technologies for Government June 13-15, 2006 in Washington DC – Registration Open

The Gilbane Group and Lighthouse Seminars in cooperation with CMS Watch, announced that the inaugural Gilbane Conference on Content Technologies for Government will take place June 13-15 at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington DC.

The official Federal government media sponsor is Post-Newsweek Media, represented by Government Computer News and Washington Technology. For complete event information and registration, visit: http://gilbane.com/gilbane-conference-washington-dc-2006/.

The conference program is divided into three tracks: Enterprise Content Management, Web Content Management and Enterprise Search & Discovery. Within these three tracks, the following topics will be addressed: Enterprise Content Management technologies, business applications, and solutions; How to get your Content Management project funded; Best practices in content governance and web operations management; Content technologies and 508 compliance; New standards in content interoperability; Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Content Management; Latest Search and text-mining technologies: beyond the hype; Comparative approaches for using XML to manage authoritative content; How different agencies have successfully implemented records management solutions; Comparative approaches to e-mail archiving; Role of new media technologies – blogs, wikis, and RSS – in public agencies; and The future of the federal government web.

There are also a number of tutorial sessions, including: A Manager’s Guide to XML; Enterprise Portals: A Primer; and Enterprise Search – Principles, Players, Practices & Pitfalls. In addition to the conference program, attendees can meet with vendors in the exhibitor showcase to see the latest content management offerings. The exhibitor showcase is free to attend.

http://www.cmswatch.com, http://gilbane.com

W3C Issues XHTML 1.0 as a Recommendation

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) released the XHTML 1.0 specification as a W3C Recommendation. This new specification represents cross-industry and expert community agreement on the importance of XHTML 1.0 as a bridge to the Web of the future. A W3C Recommendation indicates that a specification is stable, contributes to Web interoperability, and has been reviewed by the W3C membership who favors its adoption by the industry. HTML currently serves as the lingua franca for millions of people publishing hypertext on the Web. While that is the case today, the future of the Web is written in XML. XML is bringing the Web forward as an environment that better meets the needs of all its participants, allowing content creators to make structured data that can be easily processed and transformed to meet the varied needs of users and their devices. In designing XHTML 1.0, the W3C HTML Working Group faced a number of challenges, including one capable of making or breaking the Web: how to design the next generation language for Web documents without obsoleting what’s already on the Web, and how to create a markup language that supports device-independence. The answer was to take HTML 4, and rewrite it as an XML application. The first result is XHTML 1.0. XHTML 1.0 allows authors to create Web documents that work with current HTML browsers and that may be processed by XML-enabled software as well. Authors writing XHTML use the well-known elements of HTML 4 (to mark up paragraphs, links, tables, lists, etc.), but with XML syntax, which promotes markup conformance. The benefits of XML syntax include extensibility and modularity. With HTML, authors had a fixed set of elements to use, with no variation. With XHTML 1.0, authors can mix and match known HTML 4 elements with elements from other XML languages, including those developed by W3C for multimedia (Synchronized Multimedia Language – SMIL), mathematical expressions (MathML), two dimensional vector graphics (Scalable Vector Graphics – SVG), and metadata (Resource Description Framework – RDF). W3C provides instruction and tools for making the transition from HTML 4 to XHTML 1.0. The “HTML Compatibility Guidelines” section of the XHTML 1.0 Recommendation explains how to write XHTML 1.0 that will work with nearly all current HTML browsers. W3C offers validation services for both HTML and XHTML documents. W3C’s Open Source software “Tidy” helps Web authors convert ordinary HTML 4 into XHTML and clean document markup at the same time. www.w3.org/

OASIS Opens Membership

OASIS, the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards, announced the restructuring of its membership requirements, widely expanding access to its XML interoperability technical work. The non-profit consortium, which was previously open only to companies who use or provide products or services based on structured information standards such as XML, SGML and CGM, added new membership categories for individuals and associate XML industry groups. Interested parties may apply for membership online at www.oasis-open.org. OASIS membership levels now include Sponsors, Contributors, Individuals and Associates. Organizations participate in OASIS as either Sponsors or Contributors, based on the level of benefits they wish to receive. Sponsors, who take advantage of comprehensive technical and marketing benefits, support the consortium for 9500 USD annually. Contributors, who also benefit from OASIS marketing and technical work, pay 5000 USD (companies with ten or more employees) or 2500 USD (companies with fewer than ten employees). The new Individual Membership, at 250 USD per year, is offered to those who wish to participate in OASIS technical activities. Like all members, Individuals have the right to attend all OASIS general meetings, and they can fully participate in all working groups. At this level, membership is on an individual basis and is not transferable to other individuals. OASIS supports the development of XML specifications by offering an Associate Membership to individuals representing application or industry standards bodies. Associates, who pay 250 USD annually, are individuals appointed by an industry consortium or standards body (recognized as such by the OASIS Board of Directors) to represent the interests of that body in OASIS. Representatives enjoy the same rights and level of service as Individuals; the difference is that representation is transferable between individuals if the designated contact person for the represented organization gives notice. This allows continuity of participation by an organization even when it is necessary to change designated representatives. www.oasis-open.org