Archive for Customer Engagement

Harvard Business Review and WGBH transforming digital engagement

Engaging customers and online audiences requires the right mix of technology, content, and tools, orchestrated in a way that leverages deep customer knowledge to deliver the right content at the right time in the right fashion. That’s a tall order, yet it is a “do or die” imperative for organizations that use content to make a living. In this session, you’ll learn how to transform and optimize customer digital engagement from presentations by two leading-edge organizations that are paving the way to the future using a blend of customer-centric design, dynamic and targeted content, big data and analytics, agile technologies and processes, and a vision for the future. These presentations will inspire you to kick-start your own digital engagement transformation initiatives!

Update: The new HBR.org site launched a couple of weeks ago. Check it out and meet the HBR.org development team; Daigo Fujiwara, Kevin Davis, Matt Wagner, Fred Lalande, and Ismail Ozyigit will join Kevin Newman at this session.

Join us Tuesday, December, 2: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. at the Gilbane Conference to learn more.

P1. Track Keynote: Hear how Harvard Business Review and WGBH have Transformed Digital Engagement

Moderator:
Marc Strohlein, Principal, Agile Business Logic and Principal, Agile Business Logic

Speakers:
Kevin Newman, Director of Technology, Harvard Business Publishing
Rebranding and Rebuilding Harvard Business Review

Cate Twohill, Director, Technical Product Development, WGBH Educational Foundation, and George Corugedo, CTO and Co-founder, RedPoint Global Inc.
Big Data & Customer Engagement Lessons from a U.S. Media Powerhouse

See the complete conference schedule.

Speaker Spotlight: Pete Sheinbaum – Not “web content management” but “digital content management”

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Pete Sheinbaum, CEO of LinkSmart. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Pete Sheinbaum | Digital Content Management | Gilbane Conference

Speaker Spotlight: Pete Sheinbaum

CEO

LinkSmart

 

Do you think “web content management” should be the hub of digital experience management implementations? If so, should it have a new name to match an expanded role? If not, what should be at the center?

I strongly disagree that web content management should be the hub of experience management implementations. The reason I feel strongly about this is that the “web” may or may not be the hub of the digital “user” experience.

When creating a new role, job function or area of responsibility around the digital experience, it’s important for publishers to identify and carefully map the user experience to see where its hub actually lies. It may or not be web centric.

For example, where does the hub for a digital experience for cooking live? What about the hub for exercising, travel or shopping? In each of these digital experiences, the hub is far away from the web and more so mobile (although yes, people can access the web from a mobile device, but the user experience on a mobile device should be much different than a lean-forward desktop experience).

As such, I wouldn’t give the name “web content management” to the role, but I would offer an alternate with the term “digital content management.” And the owner should be well versed in how digital content and experiences should be delivered on multiple devices, in different geo locations, at different times of day. By focusing on the digital user experience, and less on the web content experience, the center and focus of this role should be clear.

Catch Up with Pete at Gilbane

Track P: Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media

P3. Content Optimization for Publishers – Two Under-appreciated Approaches
Tuesday, December 3:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Find out more about this session and our other conference sessions here.

Be sure to follow Pete and LinkSmart on Twitter @sheinbaum and @linksmart

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Speaker Spotlight: Frank Schneider – Multi-modal interface essential to mobile customer engagement

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Frank Schneider, VP of Customer Experience Solutions at Creative Virtual USA. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Frank Schneider | Gilbane Conference

Speaker Spotlight: Frank Schneider

VP Customer Experience Solutions

Creative Virtual USA

 

Is there a “Marketing Technologist” role in your organization or in organizations you know of? Should there be? What should their responsibilities be?

As technology becomes the backbone of every organization, it forces the cross pollination of roles, especially now between marketing and IT. With a shift towards data-based marketing and new relationships forming between marketing, sales and customer service, the advent of the “Marketing Technologist” is real. This shift is fueling the need for marketing automation, sales enablement, content management, knowledge management and even translation. Marketing Technologists have emerged as the perfect conduit between platform adoption and management, and the traditionally non-technical roles of sales, marketing and customer service.

With customer service becoming the new marketing and marketing’s ability to directly influence the sales pipeline, Chief Marketing Technologists are sprouting up as the perfect solution to balance a variety of needs including marketing and CRM software, content marketing, social and mobile, data and analytics, web and app development, ad networks and customer engagement programs. From social media monitoring to SEO analysis to translation management and ecommerce, Marketing Technologists are fast becoming the “must have” in every organization that is competing in a global economy.

Do you think “web content management” should be the hub of digital experience management implementations? If so, should it have a new name to match an expanded role? If not, what should be at the center?

Content marketing is evolving to become the center of digital strategy. Consequently, every organization should endeavor to employ the new role of Chief Content Officer or some derivative thereof. Managing the ebb and flow of content and messaging via multiple channels has created the need for a more comprehensive content strategy across departments and media. Channel management between web, social, and mobile have not only created opportunities to deliver messaging, but an urgent need to provide fresh material for public consumption.

Organizations must take cues from traditional publications hiring copy editors, writers and reviews to constantly curate fresh content that furthers the company’s mission, corresponds to the marketing goals and satisfies the needs of their audience. However, you do need someone leading the charge – a person that understands the mission of the content team, rallies the resources and takes ownership of getting it done. Furthermore, they need the tools to get it done. Now more than ever, technology will play an ever increasing role in how content is aggregated, curated, manage and delivered.

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge? Development and maintenance cost? Content control? Brand management? Technology expertise?

A proper macro level strategy for content delivery across multiple channels should be comprised of several key elements.

  1. Consistency. Whether it be call center agents looking for an answer or policy or a customer checking a web page, the right answer, right messaging, and proper branding should be pervasive and consistent, no matter the medium or device. Nuanced variable can be in play in regards to format, UI, and design, but at the end of the journey, customers need to feel that your content delivery allowed for a seamless experience.
  2.  Correct and Compliant. Along the lines of the first element, “correct” can mean many things. First, the item must incorporate content that is not just correct in regards to the answer from a company perspective, but answer precisely the question the customer has (in regards to what began the content search or inquiry). Furthermore, this correct answer must incorporate personalization factors; in other words, the answer must be particularly right for that customer or that profile of customer. Lastly, content must be compliant… from HIPPA, to SEC guidelines, to CPNI… content delivery must adhere to compliance guidelines will protecting the interests of both consumer and business.
  3. Automated and seamless. Content delivery across all channels must be deployed with a strategy towards, and enabled by technology and tools for, automated cross pollination and management of content. The idea of multi-channel strategy, that is, the ability to deliver in multiple channels (web, mobile/tablet, call center, IVR, social/community, branch), must mature from brainstorming strategy to refined omnichannel capability. An ominichannel content delivery system allows for authentic smart delivery of content, no matter the channel or modality.

Catch Up with Frank at Gilbane

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience

T1: Are You Leveraging All the Mobile Technologies Required for Competitive Mobile Engagement?
“Come As You Are: Multi-Modal Interface is Essential to Mobile Customer Engagement”
Tuesday, December, 3: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

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Speaker Spotlight: Arjé Cahn – What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels?

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed one of our frequently asked questions to speaker Arjé Cahn, CTO at Hippo. We’ve included his answer that question here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Arje Cahn headshot

Speaker Spotlight: Arjé Cahn

CTO

Hippo

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge?

One of the biggest challenges for delivering multichannel content is getting the people inside your organization to look past modes of distribution and think instead in terms of target audiences.  It’s important to remember that ultimately, it’s the customer choosing the channel—be it web, mobile or any upcoming digital channel. You’ve got to abstract from the idea that you’re “managing a website” and think instead of managing content, and make sure the content created makes for an optimal experience for every channel.

The challenge, in other words, is understanding your audiences. It’s important to remember that they are plural and varied. You’ve got to know who they are, what their background is, what they want—and respond accordingly, with the best personalized content. This is a business challenge that Hippo helps to solve. We help discover and understand audiences—and engage these different audiences in an understandable fashion. Hippo provides real time visitor analysis—allowing you to monitor who is experiencing your site, and keep track of the content they engage with.  With this analysis, you can see patterns over time, and turn them into personas. There’s no need to rush into targeting by applying preconceived personas to visitors. Hippo supports you in the process, providing the tools and analysis to discover personas and audiences that you might be missing out on. We help you discover and understand your audiences in an organic way—the first step to creating optimal content and customer experience.

Catch Up with Arjé at Gilbane

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

C7. Building Next Generation Web Content Management & Delivery Digital Experiences – A Panel Discussion
Wednesday, December, 4: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Follow Arjé on Twitter – @arjecahn.

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Speaker Spotlight: Brian Makas – Marketing Technologist

We recently posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference in December. Between now and the start of the event, we’ll be sharing their answers with you. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Brian Makas - Gilbane Conference Boston 2013Speaker Spotlight: Brian Makas

Director of Marketing Technology & Business Intelligence

Thomas Publishing

Follow Brian on Twitter @BrianMakas

Is there a “Marketing Technologist” role in your organization or in organizations you know of? Should there be? What should their responsibilities be?

I’m the Director of Marketing Technology & Business Intelligence for ThomasNet, does that count? While I’m very fortunate to work for a company that realizes the importance of a formal marketing technology team, I can’t say that I know of many other people with marketing technology in their job title.

The most important responsibility of any marketing technologist is to act as a trusted advisor and navigator. A marketing technologist needs to be aware of marketing’s goals at all times, be on constant lookout for hazards that may arise on the way to those goals and always be looking for alternate means of achieving those goals.

For example in my own role, when I’m looking to help our clients to prove (and improve) the ROI of their investment in ThomasNet, I’m always listening to their concerns and looking for a connection to technology:

  • What applications already exist that we can leverage?
  • What can be tracked and quantified?
  • When technology alone simply can’t connect the dots, how can we prove the influence their investment had or modify their program to maximize their likelihood of getting a strong ROI

Over the years I’ve found that unless you’re aware of what’s available and what’s going on behind the scenes it’s often impossible to even realize opportunities you’re overlooking or to notice seemingly minor details that can haunt you for years to come. Likewise, if you wait until a project is fully scoped out before involving IT, they may be able to develop what you ask for but rarely are able to develop what you really wanted. On the flip side by working as a part of the marketing team, and keeping my ears open at all times, I’m able to jump in months before IT would typically become involved to explain said opportunities and risks.

While it will certainly take time for the title to be broadly adopted, I feel the role itself is very common. I found my own start in marketing technology by inviting myself to meetings no one thought I needed to attend and offering suggestions that no one asked for. I have no doubt that as marketing’s success continues to rely on its use and understanding of digital technologies, more people will continue to champion the cause and the formal role will quickly become a critical part of every successful team.

Where You Can Find Brian at the Gilbane Conference:

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience
Session C1. Q&A with Real Live Marketing Technologists
Tuesday, December, 3: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

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Customer experiences, communications, and analytics

three epicenters of innovation in modern marketing
I recently discovered Scott Brinker’s Chief Marketing Technologist blog and recommend it as a useful resource for marketers. The Venn diagram above is from a recent post, 3 epicenters of innovation in modern marketing. It was the Venn diagram that first grabbed my attention because I love Venn diagrams as a communication tool, it reminded me of another Venn diagram well-received at the recent Gilbane Conference, and most of the conference discussions map to someplace in the illustration.

As good as the graphic is on its own, you should read Scott’s post and see what he has to say about the customer experience “revolution”.

Lest you think Scott is a little too blithe in his acceptance of the role of big data, see his The big data bubble in marketing — but a bigger future, where the first half of the (fairly long) post talks about all the hype around big data. But you should read the full post because he is right on target in describing the role of big data in marketing innovation, and in his conclusion that data-driven organizations will need to make use of big data though these data-driven and data-savvy organizations will take some time to build.

So don’t let current real or perceived hype about the role of big data in marketing lead you to discount its importance – it’s a matter of when, not if. “When” is not easy to predict, but will certainly be different depending on an organizations’ resources and ability to deal with complexity, and organizational and infrastructure changes.

Successful Deployment of Systems of Engagement: Making it Work with the Team That Will Make it Work

Gilbane Conference Workshop: Successful Deployment of Systems of Engagement: Making it Work with the Team That Will Make it Work

Instructors: Scott Liewehr, President and Principal Analyst & Rob Rose, Senior Analyst, Digital Clarity Group
November 27th, 2012, 1:00pm – 4:00pm, at the InterContinental Boston Waterfront

We’ve all heard that enterprise marketing technology tools are really only as good as they are well-implemented. So why is it that enterprises often place much more effort into selecting the tool than they do the team that will make it work for their unique needs? Even if the deployment will be performed by the internal technology team, enterprise business managers need to make sure that the team that is going to help them realize their objectives by implementing the Web Content Management (WCM), Social, Marketing Automation, Search, and Analytics systems is ready to facilitate the new world of constant change in strategic content and web engagement. This workshop will explore proven methodologies for translating business strategies into selection criteria for both technologies and the agencies and integrators that implement them. It will prepare participants to answer critical questions that will help them ensure their enterprise technologies are successful:

  • What does my organization need to be prepared for?
  • How should I determine the optimal solutions given the many options?
  • What are the best practices for finding the best team to carry out my strategy and implement my chosen technology(ies)?
  • What responsibilities do I have for making sure the team is successful, and how can I stack the deck in my favor?

We will explore all of this and more in an entertaining, informative and actionable workshop. Led by Digital Clarity Group’s Scott Liewehr and Robert Rose, attendees will leave this workshop much better equipped to make strategic decisions about how to select and work with the team that help fulfill their vision.

See the full pre-conference workshop schedule at Gilbane Boston, then [button link=”http://gilbaneboston.com/registration_information.html” variation=”red”]Register[/button].