Get a complimentary Gilbane technology showcase pass

If you can’t make all three days of the Gilbane Conference, we’ve got plenty going on in the technology showcase too. Register today to claim your free showcase pass.

Your pass includes access to:

  • Product Labs
  • Conference Opening Keynotes (8:30 – 12:00 pm Dec 2)
  • Technology Showcase
  • Networking Reception on December 2

This central meeting place gives attendees the opportunity to network with their peers and speak one-on-one with industry-leading exhibitors while learning more about their products and services.

Exhibitors include:

ActiveStandards, Adobe Systems, Alfresco, Americaneagle.com, Crafter Software, CRM Magazine, Digimind, Domo, EContent Magazine, Ektron, e-Spirit Inc., Hippo CMS, MEI, MerlinOne, HP Autonomy, KMWorld Magazine, MerlinOne, NEWSCYCLE Solutions, Oracle, Quark Software Inc., R2integrated, shufflrr, Smartling, Inc., Superior Media Solutions, and more.

Save an extra $100 off your conference pass or get a free Showcase Pass now

Venue – Special Rate Deadline is Monday

Gilbane Boston 2014 hotelThe Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel is the official conference hotel for Gilbane Conference 2014. A discounted guest room rate of $219 for a single/double room (plus applicable fees/taxes) at the Renaissance has been arranged for attendees who book by Monday, November 17, 2014. Learn more.

Speaker Spotlight: All front-end experiences should be responsive

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference. Today we’re spotlighting Jake DiMare, Digital Strategist at Agency Oasis. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Speaker Spotlight: Jake DiMare, Digital Strategist

Agency Oasis

Follow Jake: @jakedimare

Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

It sounds cliche, but I am constantly reminding anyone who will listen to take a ‘mobile first’ approach to every customer and employee facing digital property. All front-end experiences should be responsive and native apps may be an appropriate consideration whenever the customer experience will be enhanced by the ability to leverage deeper hardware features or if the overall strategy calls for an installed app on the user’s device.

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists.

It’s a really interesting time for marketing because both marketers and technologists are making a concerted effort to better understand the depth of each other’s experience and strengths. The result of this confluence is organizations’ marketing goals are better served by the emergence of better new technology while marketers are growing able to leverage the powerful features and functionality becoming available to them. At the same time organizations have stopped ‘rushing in’ to the adoption of new technology and we are seeing overwhelming demand for strategic planning around digital transformation.

This new desire to think strategically before taking action is the biggest lesson the back office can learn from marketing when undergoing digital transformation. We all know new technology is ‘disruptive’ but I think there are still organizations who fail to understand this disruption doesn’t only apply to the hopeful effect transformation will have on the competitive environment.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

This is an interesting question that’s come up a few times in the last year. The clear difference between Content Marketing and Content Strategy is one is limited in scope and highly focused on marketing goals, while the other could be applied to any aspect of organizational content from annual reports to training manuals. The other important distinction is content marketers are content producers, curators, and amplifiers. Content Strategists are, as the title implies, strategists, planners, and enablers.

Does the ‘internet of things’ have an immediate or near-term impact on your organization’s information or collaboration infrastructure? How so?

Yes, we are thinking about the appropriate content strategy to ensure content is future friendly and available across devices on all our own digital properties, as well as when advising the clients we serve.

Catch up with Jake at the Gilbane Conference:

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience

T3: Marketing Automation, Data, and Multichannel Marketing
Tuesday, December 3: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

T5: Multichannel Content Management – How do you do it?
Wednesday, December 3: 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.

Register now to hear more from Fred and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Speaker Spotlight – Content your customer needs, not what you want

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference. Today we’re spotlighting Rachel Metscher, Director of Content Marketing, ICF International. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Speaker Spotlight: Rachel D Metscher Director, Content Marketing

ICF Interactive; American Marketing Association

Follow Rachel: @rachelmetscher

Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

I think it is important to note how your content will look and feel on mobile. I know for my team, we are trying to find ways to repurpose content in visual forms; however,  it is influenced by the fact that our audience are accessing different types of information both at the office and at home.

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists.

While technology is important, it is also important to remember that technology is powered by people. People will make or break the success if implementing technology. Getting everyone on board is key to adoption. If you don’t plan for adoption and use your technology project is dead in the water. Planning is the key to success.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

Every great campaign starts with a plan. Content marketing is no different. I try to advice our team to begin with who are we reaching and why should the care. With those two questions in mind we weave our content marketing initiatives into our editorial calendar to match up the content with the audience we want to reach.  Marketers face a real challenge of quantity versus quality in an age where everyone is a publisher. Again, in my mind, the purpose of content is to communicate with your prospects in a meaningful way. It’s about creating content that your customer needs, not what you want to produce. There is a huge difference. Organizations need to rethink their content creation in terms of value and relevancy. Without value and relevancy the content cannot deliver business results.

Catch up with Rachel at the Gilbane Conference:

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

C12: Content Marketing Panel
Wednesday, December 3: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Fred and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Speaker Spotlight – Content creation a “multi-dimensional” role

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. Today we’re spotlighting Frederick Faulkner, Director, Marketing & Digital Strategist, ICF Interactive. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Fred Faulkner | Gilbane ConferenceSpeaker Spotlight: Frederick Faulkner

Director, Marketing & Digital Strategist

ICF Interactive

Follow Fred: @fredfaulkneriv

 

 

 Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

Mobile is certainly a game changer for how we now perform tasks and consume content in our digital lives. For organizations that have a growing mobile audience, it comes down to a few key factors.

First, what experience do you want your audience to have on a mobile device? What is the “top job” for a mobile setting? Chances are it will likely not be the same as the “top job” for your desktop site. So organizations will have to decide how they will effectively separate the content delivery for both settings.

Second, content creation now needs to take on a “multi-dimensional” role, thus content authors need to create content for each dimension. Mobile, and smaller screens means less attention and tolerance for long-form content. Whereas on a desktop, the screen real estate allows you to show more, add additional features, and keep attention possibly longer. Can a content author communicate the same message in less space? Will that table of data translate down to a small screen? Those are some aspects that need to be considered.

Finally, the marketing and technology teams need to work together to build the best delivery solution possible. What technology stack and implementation can support content delivery to multiple devices without the need for the author to duplicate their efforts? Streamline that process and everyone wins.

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists.

I believe the best take away from the discussion about marketing technology and marketing technologists is business departments need to engage and understand their needs and how it works within a technology stack. For example, a marketing team needs to know that some systems play better with others, the integrations, the system support and what their own IT department can maintain. They need to listen to their IT counterparts when they identify risks for the integrations, and be able to justify their needs clearly. At the same time, marketers need to use the tools to deliver ROI. We can’t live in a world where we buy tools and only use them partially, or have three tools that have overlap.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

To me, they both live in the marketing department. Content Marketing is influenced by a Content Strategy. The strategy defines who you want to market to, what the desired outcome would be, and how you grow the audience. Content marketing is a tactical execution of that strategy. Organizations need to see the forest before they can go down into the trees to get where they want to go.

Does the ‘internet of things’ have an immediate or near-term impact on your organization’s information or collaboration infrastructure? How so?

Absolutely! We work with organizations to come up with strategies and solutions to connect customers to companies. The Internet of Things is the next data point that allows organizations to build personalized experiences around their brand and products. We work with major retailers where if they knew a loyal customer was out of a certain type of product because their fridge, closet, pantry told them, a customized message or automatic replenish order could be created for in-store pick-up on their next visit.

Catch up with Fred at the Gilbane Conference:

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience

T1: Track Keynote Panel: Marketing Technologists Discuss Multichannel and Enterprise Integration Challenges
Tuesday, December 2: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Fred and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.

Speaker Spotlight questions

We posed the questions below to our conference speakers and have invited them to post their answers here. If you would like to hear what a specific speaker (list) thinks about one of the questions leave a comment and we’ll make sure they see it.

If you are a speaker or moderator and would like to post your answers let us know.

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

Marketing is the most talked about discipline that needs to take on more responsibility for technology to be effective. What can other departments learn from the discussion around marketing technology and marketing technologists?

Given that there are more smartphones than PCs on the planet and both will be important for the foreseeable future, how should organization’s content delivery priorities and technologies change? How is yours changing?

Does the ‘internet of things’ have an immediate or near-term impact on your organization’s information or collaboration infrastructure? How so?

HTML5 is now a W3C Recommendation

While HTML5 has been in use for a few years, the fact that it wasn’t a full W3C Recommendation (in layman’s terms, an official release of the next version of HTML) provided leeway for browser developer interpretation and understandably hindered more widespread adoption. All standards need to continuously evolve to remain relevant and useful so this is not the end HTML development, but now there is a stable specification that will help normalize browser support and encourage reluctant app developers to invest more fully in HTML5.

From the W3C press release:

“Today we think nothing of watching video and audio natively in the browser, and nothing of running a browser on a phone,” said Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director. “We expect to be able to share photos, shop, read the news, and look up information anywhere, on any device. Though they remain invisible to most users, HTML5 and the Open Web Platform are driving these growing user expectations.”

HTML5 brings to the Web video and audio tracks without needing plugins; programmatic access to a resolution-dependent bitmap canvas, which is useful for rendering graphs, game graphics, or other visual images on the fly; native support for scalable vector graphics (SVG) and math (MathML); annotations important for East Asian typography (Ruby); features to enable accessibility of rich applications; and much more.

For more details read the full release.

Managing and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Content

How does your organization manage and value paid, owned, and earned content? Is there a strategy for each of the three types? A budget?

If you are struggling with measuring the value of marketing related content you are certainly not alone – there is just no easy way to do it. In this session, Gerry Moran from SAP talks about the need for brands to manage and scale the three types of content together to engage customers throughout the sales cycle. Randy Woods from nonlinear creations describes a technique in use for modeling content and mapping it to online behaviors to get a better handle on content marketing costs and return.

Join us Wednesday, December, 3: 11:40 a.m. – 12:40 p.m. at the Gilbane Conference to learn more.

C9. Managing and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Content

Moderator:
Dom Nicastro, Staff Reporter, CMSWire.com

Speakers:
Gerry Moran, Head of Social Media, North America, SAP
Scaling and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Media in Your Organization
Randy Woods, President, nonlinear creations
Of Metrics and Models: Measuring the ROI of Content Marketing

See the complete conference schedule.

Speaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler – Don’t try content marketing without content strategy

As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Jeff Cutler, Content Specialist, JeffCutler.com. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event.

Jeff Cutler - Gilbane ConferenceSpeaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler

Content Specialist

JeffCutler.com

Follow Jeff: @jeffcutler

 

 

Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected disciplines. How and where should these activities be organized?

Simply put, if you don’t have a content strategy you should not undertake any content marketing. It’s the strategy component that directs smart decisions about to whom; where; and via what technologies your messaging and content will be shared. If you’re trying to connect with people and don’t have a strategy, it’s like trying to sell your services to an empty room. Figure out your audience. Figure out what tools they use to research the products/services they purchase. Determine if you have the capability and capacity to use these tools effectively. If everything clicks, move forward and start having a conversation and sharing content. Content strategy should be organized in brand and mission meetings – or at least discussed. From there it can be fine-tuned and then revisited before embarking on the content marketing campaign. Once approved, use the content strategy to develop a plan – including content calendar, resources, communication vehicles, sites, technology and more – that will help achieve the goals of that strategy.

Catch up with Jeff at the Gilbane Conference:

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

C12: Content Marketing Panel
Wednesday, December 3: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Register now to hear more from Jeff and all of our speakers.

See our complete conference program for more details.