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Additional Gilbane Conference workshops posted

Gilbane conference lightbulb logo

We’ll be posting the complete program for this years’ Gilbane Conference over the next 2-3 weeks on the main conference website. The afternoon workshops are below.

Workshop D. Adaptive Content Modeling for Omnichannel UX

Speaker: Noz Urbina, Consultant and Founder, Urbina Consulting

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Your users need you to come to this session, even if they don’t know it. Multi-channel, or “COPE (create once, publish everywhere)”, content is a bit of a holy grail. Our trade is discussing content being freed from the browser, available for reuse, and accessible in apps, kiosks, responsive mobile deliverables, eBooks and syndication services to our partners – even in wearable technologies. All this should improve the experience of users, and benefit the organizations that serve them. Adaptive content is content that is nimble enough to realize all these ambitions. But making our content adaptive means addressing a topic that sends many running for the fire exit or nearest window: semantic modeling of structured content. This session will connect the dots between adaptive content, responsive design, multi-channel delivery and user experiences to show you why you want and even need to have semantic content structures. It will then go through a non-terrifying introduction to getting started with modeling your own content in a future-proof way. Learning objectives:

  1. The knowledge that their content is already more structured than they realize.
  2. A solid sense of what semantic, structured content actually is and its relationship to adaptive content, multichannel, and UX.

This workshop is designed for either intermediate or expert attendees. Bring your laptop and go home with samples and templates.

Workshop E. CMS Implementations: The View from the Implementor’s Side

Speaker: Deane Barker, Director of Business Development, Blend Interactive

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Ever wanted to know how CMS integration shops approach projects, and how you can better work with them or use their techniques in your own organization? In this workshop, Deane Barker will explain the ins and outs of CMS project work from the perspective of a veteran integrator, with the goal of helping you understand how best to find an integrator, work with your chosen integrator, or manage your project and team. Learn about how integrators:

  • Evaluate RFPs
  • Develop proposals
  • Scope projects
  • Schedule work
  • Manage client expectations
  • Plan implementations
  • Select software
  • Execute and manage development
  • Support existing implementations

Workshop F. What’s it Worth? Assessing the ROI of your Content

Speaker: Lindy Roux, VP, Content Marketing and Strategy, Rauxa

Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

No matter how well researched and deliberate your content strategy is, the proof lies in the pudding and the most successful content professionals continually evaluate the effectiveness of their content and adapt their strategies to improve the return. Too often, content is evaluated or audited only when a major digital shift is in play (a move to a new CMS, a new marketing automation tool, a new campaign launch.) In order to be truly successful, that evaluation should be ongoing, providing the opportunity to learn from past content marketing successes and failures. Lindy Roux will demonstrate an approach to content evaluation across multiple channels, based on qualitative and quantitative assessments, which has been used to help organizations understand the true ROI of a piece of content. The session will end with a practical exercise in content evaluation where participants will try their hand at developing assessment criteria and then applying these to real content. Participants in the session will learn:

  • How to establish content goals that are measurable and realistic
  • A way to evaluate content against these goals
  • How to establish a regular review workflow and process
  • An approach to optimization across all channels
  • The appropriate team structure for ongoing content performance
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First three Gilbane Conference workshops posted

Gilbane conference lightbulb logo
We’ll be posting the complete program for this years’ Gilbane Conference over the next 4-5 weeks on the main conference website. The first three of the six planned workshops are below.

Workshop A. Insiders Guide to Building Digital Marketing Technology Toolkit

Speaker: Theresa Regli, Principal Analyst and Managing Partner, Real Story Group

Thursday, December, 4: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Marketing practitioners multitask just about every minute of every day. There are ongoing email, web, mobile, and marketing strategies to organize, plan and execute. Each of these areas used to include a range of technologies that was purchased and implemented separately such as web content management, campaign management, analytics, digital asset management, and others. Now, there are new suites of tools that can manage all of these processes. But how do you select the right one that will help you to accomplish your marketing objectives?

Specifically, the session will provide a methodology for mapping business needs to technology alternatives, as well as a road map for evaluating digital marketing technology vendors.  We will provide critical and hard-hitting reviews of the available digital marketing technologies. Don’t be surprised after-the-fact. Find out the real strengths and weaknesses of these tools before you purchase them.

Key Takeaways:

  • Digital marketing trends and emerging architectures
  • Hints and tips on selecting a digital marketing product for your organization
  • Overcoming the daunting prospect of selection – how to narrow down your list of vendors to evaluate.
  • A critical, high-level overview of digital marketing solution providers

Workshop B. Foundations for Best-Fit WCM Service Provider Selections

Speaker: Cathy McKnight, Partner and Principal Analyst, Digital Clarity Group

Thursday, December, 4: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Evaluating and selecting technology and service partners is intimidating. And without proper guidance, it’s easy to take the wrong path. This workshop focuses on selection readiness. It is designed to point your organization in the right direction before you even start the journey to new solutions for web content and experience management. You will learn how to create a plan of action for getting your organization ready for a successful selection program – one that results in real business benefits as the direct result of implementing the right solutions with the right technology and service partners. We explore the fundamentals of selection preparation, covering four key areas of readiness:

  • Articulating the business case,
  • Identifying the stakeholder landscape,
  • Managing requirements gatherings, and
  • Developing realistic budgets.

We provide a step-by-step overview of an efficient, results-driven selection program, and we show you how to build a messaging and communications plan that will help you shape internal conversations about it. With this approach, you can set expectations, educate reluctant stakeholders, and get your company thinking about change management, which is often an afterthought but shouldn’t be. The selection process is all about aligning business goals with the “best-fit” solution for your organization’s needs. And finding that fit is about way more than just matching features to requirements. Armed with the outcomes of this workshop, you will be ready to move forward with confidence.

Workshop C. Successful Social Intranets

Speaker: Rebecca Rodgers, Senior Consultant, Step Two Designs

Thursday, December, 4: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Modern intranets are steadily becoming more “social” and “collaborative”, but this can mean many things. Some recent intranets put social at the heart of everything (including the homepage), while others supplement existing sites with simpler features, such as commenting. While this is still a rapidly evolving space, intranet teams in the real world need to make concrete decisions with confidence.

This interactive workshop will cover four key steps for social intranets:

  • Explore the opportunities. Looking at social intranet examples around the globe, we will explore the reasons, benefits and business cases for social.
  • Understand your organisational landscape. Every organisation is different, and this has a big impact on the what, where, when and how of social intranets.
  • Choose what to launch. Where to start, what to launch and for who: there are multiple options to choose from, depending on your strategy and organisational context.
  • Make social a success. There are a growing list of best practices to draw on, relating to design, launch, adoption and governance.

This inspirational and practical workshop will mix plenty of screenshots and examples with discussions and workshop activities. While not every question will be answered, participants will walk away with a greater sense of confidence and knowledge about social intranets.

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Deadline Reminder – Gilbane Conference call for papers

Don’t miss The Gilbane Conference Call for Papers

Proposal deadline is May 9!

The Gilbane Conference on Content and the Digital Experience is designed for marketers, content managers, technologists, and executives responsible for building strategies and implementations for compelling multichannel digital experiences for customers, employees, and partners. Topics are organized into four main tracks:

Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience – Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, growth hackers, content managers, strategists and technologists focused on customers and digital marketing.

Content, Collaboration and Employee Engagement – Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on enterprise social, collaboration, intranet, portal, knowledge, and backend content applications.

Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience – Designed for technology strategists, IT, and executives focused on the future of content and either internal or external digital experiences.

Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media – Designed for publishing and information product managers, marketers, technologists, and business or channel managers focused on the transition to digital products.

If you have not spoken at our conference before please read the Speaker Guidelines.

Send your proposal today!

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Speaker Spotlight: Karl Wirth – Real time and relevant content

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Karl Wirth, CEO and Co-Founder of Evergage. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Karl Wirth | Gilbane Conference
Speaker Spotlight: Karl Wirth

Co-Founder and CEO

Evergage

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge? Development and maintenance cost? Content control? Brand management? Technology expertise?

I believe the best overall strategy is delivering relevant content to audiences. Thanks to Big Data and technology, organizations now have the ability to serve their users and visitors dynamic, personalized content, based off of their behaviors and actions. Increasing relevancy and interacting with people in real time will capture attention, drive engagement, and ultimately increase conversions.

Real-time behavior-based personalization:

  • Is always relevant
  • Drives customer engagement
  • Compels action
  • Increases conversion rates

The biggest challenges that we have observed are:

  • Lack of resources – a customer success manager or marketer may not have the time to utilize a new technology
  • Budget constraints – organizations may not have budgeted for a new marketing tool
  • Content control – content may be managed by different departments creating inconsistencies and ownership confusion

The truth is that the days of static and irrelevant content are over. In our customer-driven world, organizations should invest to get to know their customers and tailor content to their actions.

Catch Up with Karl at Gilbane

Product Labs


Wednesday, December 4:  3:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Find out more about this session and our other conference sessions here.

Be sure to follow Karl @Evergage

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Speaker Spotlight: Pawan Deshpande – You need a marketing technologist and a marketing strategist

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Pawan Deshpande, Founder and CEO of Curata. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Pawan Deshpande | Gilbane Conference speaker

Speaker Spotlight: Pawan Deshpande

Founder and CEO

Curata

 

Is there a “Marketing Technologist” role in your organization or in organizations you know of? Should there be? What should their responsibilities be?

There is no doubt that marketing technology is here to stay.  Some analyst firms have even predicted that marketing’s technology budget will one day outpace that of the IT department. (i.e., Forrester)  In order to manage the increased adoption and leverage of technology across the marketing organization, as well as integration with other functions, CMOs will need to put in place a marketing technologist role.  Two questions may come to mind when reading this recommendation:

      1. Isn’t that the role of marketing operations?; and
      2. Isn’t that the role of the IT department?

The marketing operations (MO) role first developed approximately 8-10 years ago, as covered by IDC’s CMO Advisory Service, (i.e., Rise of the Marketing Operations Function). The MO role was developed in response to the need for a process-oriented marketer who would be able to apply greater rigor to marketing’s investment management, demand generation process, performance measurement process, and overall technology. Although this role proved highly valuable in the short-term for change management, the rapid growth of marketing technology and the need for greater marketing accountability proved too much to bear for one function. More importantly, each marketing area needed to have its own level of expertise and rigor in process and technology.

Some marketing organizations attempted to increase their dependence on the IT department. However, this strategy proved detrimental since marketing technology was rarely a priority for IT teams, and IT lacks the in depth understanding of the marketing process. Better organizations tapped into the power of SaaS solutions to bypass IT, however, this still left a very disjointed marketing technology strategy. Enter the marketing technologist.

Marketing technology touches every part of marketing’s “supply chain”; from awareness building (e.g., social media, content marketing) to demand generation (e.g., lead processing, lead nurturing) to sales enablement (e.g., content management and delivery to sales and partners). Having a marketing technologist in larger organizations provides the opportunity to develop and deploy a more connected marketing strategy across the organization. This individual/team will be responsible for managing the technology associated with the different elements of marketing, as well as collaborating with the following teams: marketing-dedicated folks within IT, sales operations, and finance. (i.e., at global, regional and business unit levels). Specific examples where this role could add value include:

  • Developing a marketing technology roadmap across all functional areas (current, 1 year and 3 year plan);
  • Continuing to refine the demand management process (e.g., integration of marketing automation with sales’ pipeline process/technology); and
  • Taking on the new challenge of supporting content marketing from a technology perspective. (e.g., content creation, content curation, content lifecycle management).

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge? Development and maintenance cost? Content control? Brand management? Technology expertise?

If you ask any large company CMO about their content inventory, they will quickly tell you that they have too much content. A conversation with the same company’s digital marketing team (i.e., the team that delivers content to blogs, microsites, newsletters, web sites and social media channels) will reveal that they don’t have enough content. Herein lies the greatest challenge for delivering digital content: Putting the process and technology in place for disparate parts of an organization to collaborate on developing relevant and high quality for their audience; and getting this content to them in the right time, place, and format to drive greater engagement. Addressing this challenge will require the development of two new roles in marketing: a senior level marketing strategist to develop and deploy a content management process (e.g., VP Content Strategy) and a marketing technologist.

Catch Up with Pawan at Gilbane

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience


Wednesday, December 4:  2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Find out more about this session and our other conference sessions here.

Be sure to follow Pawan @TweetsFromPawan

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Speaker Spotlight: Irina Guseva – Neither WCM nor experience management new

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed one of our frequently asked questions to speaker Irina Guseva, Principal Analyst at Real Story Group. We’ve included her answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Irina Guseva | WCM and experience management | Gilbane Conference

Speaker Spotlight: Irina Guseva

Principal Analyst

Real Story Group

 

Do you think “web content management” should be the hub of digital experience management implementations? If so, should it have a new name to match an expanded role? If not, what should be at the center?

Web content management has seen a great deal of evolution since its inception in the early-mid-1990s. Experience management is not a new discipline either, but has garnered heightened attention in the recent few years. The question here is not the chicken-egg type. The question here is having a solid strategy for managing customer experiences (online and offline) first and foremost. The next step is to support this strategy with appropriate and carefully selected technology that matches your needs: be it WCM, DAM, or Digital Marketing tools.

Catch Up with Irina at Gilbane

Track C: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience

Tuesday, December 3:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

and

Post-Conference Workshops

Thursday, December 5: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 

Find out more about this session and our other conference sessions here.

Be sure to follow Irina @realstorygroup

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Speaker Spotlight: Pete Sheinbaum – Not “web content management” but “digital content management”

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Pete Sheinbaum, CEO of LinkSmart. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Pete Sheinbaum | Digital Content Management | Gilbane Conference

Speaker Spotlight: Pete Sheinbaum

CEO

LinkSmart

 

Do you think “web content management” should be the hub of digital experience management implementations? If so, should it have a new name to match an expanded role? If not, what should be at the center?

I strongly disagree that web content management should be the hub of experience management implementations. The reason I feel strongly about this is that the “web” may or may not be the hub of the digital “user” experience.

When creating a new role, job function or area of responsibility around the digital experience, it’s important for publishers to identify and carefully map the user experience to see where its hub actually lies. It may or not be web centric.

For example, where does the hub for a digital experience for cooking live? What about the hub for exercising, travel or shopping? In each of these digital experiences, the hub is far away from the web and more so mobile (although yes, people can access the web from a mobile device, but the user experience on a mobile device should be much different than a lean-forward desktop experience).

As such, I wouldn’t give the name “web content management” to the role, but I would offer an alternate with the term “digital content management.” And the owner should be well versed in how digital content and experiences should be delivered on multiple devices, in different geo locations, at different times of day. By focusing on the digital user experience, and less on the web content experience, the center and focus of this role should be clear.

Catch Up with Pete at Gilbane

Track P: Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media

P3. Content Optimization for Publishers – Two Under-appreciated Approaches
Tuesday, December 3:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Find out more about this session and our other conference sessions here.

Be sure to follow Pete and LinkSmart on Twitter @sheinbaum and @linksmart

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Speaker Spotlight: Frank Schneider – Multi-modal interface essential to mobile customer engagement

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker Frank Schneider, VP of Customer Experience Solutions at Creative Virtual USA. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

Frank Schneider | Gilbane Conference

Speaker Spotlight: Frank Schneider

VP Customer Experience Solutions

Creative Virtual USA

 

Is there a “Marketing Technologist” role in your organization or in organizations you know of? Should there be? What should their responsibilities be?

As technology becomes the backbone of every organization, it forces the cross pollination of roles, especially now between marketing and IT. With a shift towards data-based marketing and new relationships forming between marketing, sales and customer service, the advent of the “Marketing Technologist” is real. This shift is fueling the need for marketing automation, sales enablement, content management, knowledge management and even translation. Marketing Technologists have emerged as the perfect conduit between platform adoption and management, and the traditionally non-technical roles of sales, marketing and customer service.

With customer service becoming the new marketing and marketing’s ability to directly influence the sales pipeline, Chief Marketing Technologists are sprouting up as the perfect solution to balance a variety of needs including marketing and CRM software, content marketing, social and mobile, data and analytics, web and app development, ad networks and customer engagement programs. From social media monitoring to SEO analysis to translation management and ecommerce, Marketing Technologists are fast becoming the “must have” in every organization that is competing in a global economy.

Do you think “web content management” should be the hub of digital experience management implementations? If so, should it have a new name to match an expanded role? If not, what should be at the center?

Content marketing is evolving to become the center of digital strategy. Consequently, every organization should endeavor to employ the new role of Chief Content Officer or some derivative thereof. Managing the ebb and flow of content and messaging via multiple channels has created the need for a more comprehensive content strategy across departments and media. Channel management between web, social, and mobile have not only created opportunities to deliver messaging, but an urgent need to provide fresh material for public consumption.

Organizations must take cues from traditional publications hiring copy editors, writers and reviews to constantly curate fresh content that furthers the company’s mission, corresponds to the marketing goals and satisfies the needs of their audience. However, you do need someone leading the charge – a person that understands the mission of the content team, rallies the resources and takes ownership of getting it done. Furthermore, they need the tools to get it done. Now more than ever, technology will play an ever increasing role in how content is aggregated, curated, manage and delivered.

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge? Development and maintenance cost? Content control? Brand management? Technology expertise?

A proper macro level strategy for content delivery across multiple channels should be comprised of several key elements.

  1. Consistency. Whether it be call center agents looking for an answer or policy or a customer checking a web page, the right answer, right messaging, and proper branding should be pervasive and consistent, no matter the medium or device. Nuanced variable can be in play in regards to format, UI, and design, but at the end of the journey, customers need to feel that your content delivery allowed for a seamless experience.
  2.  Correct and Compliant. Along the lines of the first element, “correct” can mean many things. First, the item must incorporate content that is not just correct in regards to the answer from a company perspective, but answer precisely the question the customer has (in regards to what began the content search or inquiry). Furthermore, this correct answer must incorporate personalization factors; in other words, the answer must be particularly right for that customer or that profile of customer. Lastly, content must be compliant… from HIPPA, to SEC guidelines, to CPNI… content delivery must adhere to compliance guidelines will protecting the interests of both consumer and business.
  3. Automated and seamless. Content delivery across all channels must be deployed with a strategy towards, and enabled by technology and tools for, automated cross pollination and management of content. The idea of multi-channel strategy, that is, the ability to deliver in multiple channels (web, mobile/tablet, call center, IVR, social/community, branch), must mature from brainstorming strategy to refined omnichannel capability. An ominichannel content delivery system allows for authentic smart delivery of content, no matter the channel or modality.

Catch Up with Frank at Gilbane

Track T: Re-imagining the Future: Technology and the Postdigital Experience

T1: Are You Leveraging All the Mobile Technologies Required for Competitive Mobile Engagement?
“Come As You Are: Multi-Modal Interface is Essential to Mobile Customer Engagement”
Tuesday, December, 3: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Speaker Spotlight: John Felahi – Making content findable

In another installment of Speaker Spotlight, we posed a couple of our frequently asked questions to speaker John Felahi, Chief Strategy Officer at Content Analyst Company, LLC. We’ve included his answers here. Be sure to see additional Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference.

John_Felahi-horiz

Speaker Spotlight: John Felahi

Chief Strategy Officer

Content Analyst Company, LLC

 

What is the best overall strategy for delivering content to web, multiple mobile, and upcoming digital channels? What is the biggest challenge? Development and maintenance cost? Content control? Brand management? Technology expertise?

One of the biggest challenges to delivering content to the web is making it as findable as possible to potential interested viewers.  While traditional, manual tagging and keyword search methods may have gotten us this far, and may be good enough for some use cases, they’re still not without limitations. The good news is, there are far more advanced, sophisticated – and automated – technologies available to remedy the numerous limitations of manual tagging content and keyword-based search. The limitations of manual tagging and keyword-based include:

  • Term creep – New terms constantly emerge, requiring taxonomies to be constantly updated.
  • Polysemy – Take Apple, for example. Is your user searching for the company, the Beatles’ record label, or the fruit?
  • Acronyms – Texting has introduced an entirely new language of acronyms (LOL, TTYL, WDYT).  Manually tagging content requires the editor to consider possible acronyms the users will be searching for.
  • Abbreviations – Tagging content with long, scientific terms, geographies, etc. require editors to factor these in along with the long terms they represent.
  • Misspellings – Thanks to spellcheck and autocorrect, technology has become much more forgiving for those who never made it past the first round eliminations in their sixth grade spelling bee. Content search, unfortunately, needs to be equally accommodating, if you want your users to find your content – which means tagging it with common misspellings.
  • Language – The web has certainly made the world a much smaller place, but that doesn’t mean everyone speaks English.  Making content findable in any language means it has to also be tagged in multiple languages.

On to the good news – there’s technology that’s been used for years in eDiscovery and the US Intelligence Community to overcome these very challenges, but for different reasons. Because the bad guys aren’t tagging their content to make it more findable, the intel community needs a better way to find what they’re looking for. And in eDiscovery, finding relevant content can make a multi-million dollar difference to the outcome of a particular litigation or other regulatory matter. That’s why tens of thousands of legal reviewers and countless analysts in the intel community use a technology known as concept-aware advanced analytics.

How concept-aware advanced analytics differs from manual tagging and keyword search

As its name implies, concept-aware understands the underlying concepts within the content. As such, it can tag content automatically.  On the viewer’s side, content can be found by simply saying, “find more like this.” Categories are defined by taking examples that represent the concepts of a category. The system “learns” what that category is all about, and can then identify conceptually similar content and apply the same category. The process is the same on the search side. The user points to a piece of content and says, “find more like this.” Or as the content publisher, you present the viewer with conceptually similar content, i.e., “you may also be interested in these articles.”

While concept-aware advanced analytics doesn’t necessarily replace manual tagging and keyword search – which work very well in certain situations – the technology clearly overcomes many of the limitations of traditional tagging and search methods.

Catch Up with John at Gilbane

Track E: Content, Collaboration, and the Employee Experience

E7: Strategic Imperatives for Enterprise Search to Succeed
Wednesday, December, 4: 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Complete Program Conference Schedule Register Today

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Gilbane Complimentary Technology Showcase Pass

Gilbane technology showcase ticket

 

Can’t make all three days of the Gilbane Conference?  We’ve got plenty going on in the technology showcase too. Take advantage of our complimentary showcase pass today.

 

Your Showcase Pass Includes Access to:

  • Six Keynote Presentations
  • All Product Labs
  • Technology Showcase Area
  • Sponsor Networking Reception


Register for your free pass now

Opening Keynotes – December 3: 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Moderator:
, CEO, Bluebill Advisors Inc and Founder & Chair, Gilbane Conferences

Speakers:
, Head of Social Media, North America, SAP
How to Make Yourself a Content Stop on the New Buyer Journey
, Senior Director, eCommerce Platform System Management, Marriott International
Rethinking Content Delivery: Moving beyond a Traditional Web Content Management Approach
, Founder & CTO, ion interactive, inc. and Author, Chief Marketing Technologist Blog
What is a Marketing Technologist?

Opening Keynotes – December 3: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Moderator:
, CEO, Bluebill Advisors Inc and Founder & Chair, Gilbane Conferences

Speakers:
, Research Director, Marketing Leaders Research Team, Gartner
Move Over Big Data – Here Comes Big Content
, Vice President and Research Director, Forrester Research
The Context Conundrum?
, Founder, Real Story Group
ShakesPoint: What the Bard Could Teach Us About SharePoint – And The Digital World

Product Labs

The Product Labs are open to conference attendees and visitors to the technology showcase free of charge, and are moderated and presented by conference sponsors. While the presentations are meant to be educational, they are typically focused on product technologies or customer case studies. They provide a good opportunity to learn more about specific products or vendors. See the schedule here.

Exhibitors

The Technology Showcase provides attendees with a central meeting place and the ability to speak one-on-one with industry-leading exhibitors while learning more about their products and services. See the exhibitors here.

Showcase Hours:

Tuesday, December 3          10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Networking Reception         5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, December 4    10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

You can also still register for the full conference:

Register today and save $100. Plus, get a free Google Nexus 7 with your ConferencePlus pass

 

PLATINUM SPONSOR             GOLD SPONSORS Alfresco Software Crafter Software
Adobe e-Spirit Inc. HP Autonomy SDL Sitecore
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